Good Picture Books about Lent and Easter for Catholic Kids

Thinking about Easter yet? Or concentrating on participating in Lent to the fullest? Here are some wonderful books to assist all ages in entering into these seasons of penitence and rejoicing.


The Story of Easter is a sweet little board book for the smallest children. It ties together spring, new life, and Jesus rising from the dead neatly, stressing that Easter is really about Jesus loving us through his death and resurrection.

 

 

 

 


The Easter Cave tells the Easter story in a simple, rhythmic style inspired by “The House that Jack Built.”

 

 

 

 

 


In The Easter Swallows, children see the Passion and Resurrection through the eyes of two kind little swallows.

 

 

 

 

 


The Legend of the Easter Robin: An Easter Story of Compassion and Faith is a charming story about compassion and trusting God. A little girl learns to trust God through uncertainty as her Grandmother teaches her the legend of the Easter robin.

 

 


There are many great versions of the Stations of the Cross for Children. Here is wonderful one for ages 5-10 from Word Among Us Press: Walking with Jesus to Calvary: Stations of the Cross for Children. For each station, there is a description of what happened, then a personal prayer to encourage the child to speak straight to Jesus.

 

 

 

 


Little Colts Palm Sunday is the perfect story to read on Palm Sunday. The author fancifully imagines Palm Sunday through the eyes of the colt that carried Jesus into Jerusalem.

 

 

 

 


Also perfect to begin on Palm Sunday, The Easter Story Egg is a book and nesting egg. Each day between Palm Sunday and Easter, your family opens an egg and reads the accompanying Bible verses and meditation.

 

 


Looking for the Easter story as recounted in the Gospels? Fiona French’s beautiful book Easter may be the perfect fit. She uses colorful pictures inspired by stained glass windows to bring the Passion and Resurrection to life in a luminous way.

 

 

 

 


Little Rose of Sharon is a poignant story which explores themes about true beauty and self-sacrifice. A vain little rose eventually chooses to give up all her beautiful petals to keep an egg warm, thus imitating the total self-sacrifice of Jesus on the cross.

 

 

 

 


In this folktale retold, three trees dream about their future. Each tree finds its dreams achieved, but in a different way than they ever could have expected.The Tale of Three Trees is a lesson in divine providence and self-sacrifice.

 

 

 

 


Rechenka’s Eggs is a story about giving, friendship, and how eggs are a sign of the miracle of new life.

Good Graphic Novels and Comic Books for Catholic Kids

Comic Books and Graphic Novels are the reading material of choice for many kids these days, especially boys. Fortunately for Catholic parents, there are some awesome options being published in this genre by Catholic publishers. Check out these great options which teach about Saints, the Bible, the Catechism, and apologetics! Also included are a few clean, enjoyable comic books just for fun!

I recently had the pleasure of reading and reviewing “The Saints Chronicles, Collection 1”, the first in a great new series being published by Sophia Institute Press. For more details, check out my review here.

 

 

 


The Adventures of Loupio chronicle the escapades of Loupio, a young troubador whose life is forever changed when he meets Saint Francis of Assisi.

 

 

 

 


Pauline Press is coming out with its own series of graphic novels based on the lives of popular saints with books like Legend of Saint Christopher and  and Saint Clare of Assisi.

 

 

 


The Action Bible is one of the most professional looking graphic novels on this list. Little surprise since its illustrator works for Marvels Comics! This Bible isn’t specifically Catholic, but it sticks fairly close to the Bible stories and is a great way to get kids interested in reading God’s word.

 

 

 

The Picture Bible, which inspired The Action Bible, is also a great resource for bringing to the Bible to life for kids! It points out themes and has some discussion questions for the major stories.

 

 

 

 


The Illustrated Parables of Jesus is published by Ignatius Press, which also publishes an entire New Testament by the same illustrator and author. We love these versions of the Bible with their gentle pictures which even toddlers enjoy pouring over.

 

 

 


I’ve included the Catechism of the Seven Sacraments on other book lists already because I can’t say enough good things about this brilliant idea for a Catechism. The information is simply presented, yet somehow touches on information many adult Catholics don’t know. For example, my six year old understands the Four Cups and how they relate to the Mass after reading this book. He had to explain it to me because I barely knew what he was talking about!

 

 


I was extremely impressed by the caliber of apologetics presented in The Truth Is Out There: Brendan & Erc in Exile, Volume 1. This book, and its sequel, The Big Picture: Brendan and Erc in Exile, Volume 2, present arguments for Christian and Catholic doctrines in a format that will be accessible and memorable for tweens and teens. Volume 1 deals with big picture questions about God’s existence, heaven, and happiness. The presupposition is that you are talking to someone who is an atheist or agnostic, which will resonate with teenagers as they begin to interact more with secularists. In Volume 2, The Big Picture, Brendan and Eric begin to learn about God’s plan. Again, there is an outspoken agnostic character who challenges the RCIA teacher about everything from Galileo to the Trinity. All this hard core apologetics is set against an appealing Sci Fi backdrop complete with junky space ships and villains.

 


The Zita the Spacegirl Trilogy  is an award winining series from Catholic graphic novelist Ben Hatke. His books are clean, age-appropriate, fun, and definitely worth buying!

 

 

 

 


Mighty Jack is the first in another great series by Hatke. With nods to Jack and the Beanstalk, Hatke creates an exciting world inhabited by dragons and biting pumpkins. I love that one of the characters is a (mostly) mute autistic girl. I found the themes about having a sibling with a disability timely in our current day with autism rates skyrocketing.

 

 

 


The Adventures of Tintin by Herge. What can I say? TinTin is a classic boy-sleuth series that every boy (and lots of girls) inhale. These books are clean, fun, and funny. Lots of adventure and quirky characters. Note that there is some drug and alcohol use, not portrayed favorably. Also some rather humorous swearing along the lines of “Billions of Blue Blistering Barnacles in a Thundering Typhoon.”

Good Books for… Catholic 10 to 11 year olds

There are a lot of awesome books for 10 to 11 year olds! On this list, I have included books from a wide range of genres. Many classic children’s books such as Little House and A Little Princesscan be introduced at this age. More in depth biographies of saints are, of course, good reading material. Historical fiction from both Catholic and secular authors is a fun way to expand your child’s understanding of historical eras. I also include some fantasy and modern children’s fiction to round out the reading diet.

Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons series is my personal favorite when it comes to children’s series. Ransome’s command of the English language and skill as a storyteller make for charming adventures featuring three sets of siblings in the English lake country. Your child is sure to identify with one of the cast of characters and wish to read more of the stories, gaining an appreciation for fine writing and heaps of useful information about everything from sailing to gold mining to pigeon keeping.
Discussion: How are the different strengths and personalities of the characters integral to the sucessful completion of the adventure?

Ignatius Press has a wonderful series of Saint biographies called the Vision books. This series features saints sych as Kateri Tekakwitha: Mohawk Maiden, Saint Francis of the Seven Seas , Saint Therese and the Roses , and Saint Ignatius and the Company of Jesus . All the books in the Vision series are written simply and engagingly and should be as exciting and inspiring as an adventure story for Catholic kids.

Another great series with about 30 books, including some on recently canonized saints such as Saint Maximilian Kolbe, Saint Gianna Beretta Molla, Saints Jacinta and Francisco Marto and Saint John Paul II, is Pauline Books and Media’s Encounter the Saints series.

A third wonderful series about saints for this age range is Mary Fabyan Windeatt’s Lives of the Saints series. She writes simply but eloquently about saints such as Saint Martin de Porres and St. Rose of Lima.

Marguerite Henry’s Misty of Chincoteague is another book every child should read, both for her fine writing and compelling story. Two children’s perseverance in catching and buying their special pony is a fine story, but when you add the deeper theme of sacrifice for another’s good, then you have a great classic.
Discussion: What do Paul and Maureen sacrifice for love of Phantom?
If you love Misty, Paul and Maureen, there are two sequels: Stormy, Misty’s Foal and Sea Star: Orphan of Chincoteague.

Marguerite Henry also wrote a tall stack of other books about horses. My favorites include King of the Wind: The Story of the Godolphin Arabian, which is a sandy middle eastern story about a real horse from whom many Arabians today are descended, and Justin Morgan Had a Horse, which is again based on the facts of how the Morgan breed was developed.

If your family hasn’t encountered Hilda Van Stockum yet, you are in for a treat. This gifted Catholic author wrote some truly wonderful children’s books about the triumphs and disasters, humorous moments and touching times, all experienced by a large, happy family. The Mitchells: Five for Victory is the first book in her series about the American Mitchell family. The first book sees the family through World War II, and the two sequels, Canadian Summer and Friendly Gables , follow the family on a transcontinental move to Canada, a summer in a primitive cottage, and eventually to their new home in Montreal.

Prepare for a bit o’ Irish brogue creeping into your chikdren’s conversation when you give them Hilda Van Stockum’s Bantry Bay Trilogy: The Cottage at Bantry Bay, Francie on the Run , and Pegeen . These stories about the poor but happy O’Sullivan clan are chockful of gentle family adventures and Irish charm.
Discussion: Are the O’Sullivans happier for being poor in material things?

The Winged Watchman is an amazing adventure about the Dutch resistance in World War II and their work to help the Jews. Young Jan teaches a powerful lesson of bravery, perseverance, and protecting the innocent which any child will benefit from reading. The horrors of the war and evil the Nazis inflicted on the Jews are mentioned, but not described graphically.

The Good Master and The Singing Tree by Kate Seredy are two of my favorite books of all time, though very different books. The Good Master is a warm family embrace, the story of young Jansci, his patient, wise father, and kind, hardworking mother taking in his troubled cousin Kate and transforming her life through everyday farm work and family love. It is hilarious and heart warming and full of colorful Hungarian traditions. Its sequel, The Singing Tree, is a darker war story as Jansci takes charge of the farm and an ever-growing flock of fleeing family members, homeless refugees, orphans, and Russian prisoners of war. With moments of humor, this book is poignant and touching and deeply inspiring. Jansci and Kate’s hard work and open hearts bring joy to all that find refuge on the farm.

C. S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia hold a well-deserved place in the canon of children’s classics. These books’ clearly defined battles between good and evil and extensive Christian symbolism and allegory, combined with a fantaay setting and engaging characters, make these books basically perfect material to capture and inspire a child’s imagination.
Discussion: Encourage your child to note as many parallels to and symbols of Christianity as possible.

Laura Ingalls Wilder’s The Little House books are American classics, important reading for their accurate portrayal of pioneer life, for the many lessons about growing in virtue, and because Laura is a fine writer. The later books in the series, when Laura is grown up, are not as appropriate or particulary interesting for a 10 or 11 year old, but the first four books and Farmer Boy are perfect to introduce at this age.

Nancy Carpenter Brown has simplified four of G. K. Chesterton’s most popular stories to create a great introduction to this master for younger children. The Father Brown Reader: Stories from Chesterton will inspire your child to want to read the original Father Brown stories in a few years.

Jean Craighead George’s My Side of the Mountain Trilogy is perfect for the adventurous, the animal and nature lover, or the dreamer. These stories of a boy building a home in the wilderness and taming a falcon are sure to inspire courage, perseverance, resourcefulness, creative thinking, and a good work ethic.
Discussion idea: Sam’s family lives in an overcrowded city apartment so he decides to go live on his grandfather’s remote acreage. Although this is a wonderful story to read, is it really a good idea for a young boy to go off and live alone in the woods? Or was it okay for Sam to go since his parents approved?

Elizabeth Enright created the memorable Melendy Quartet back in the 1940’s, but these four children’s personalities still burst forth from the pages. In The Saturdays (Melendy Quartet), the siblings explore Manhattan by an ingenuous plan of pooling their allowance so that each child has enough to make a trip once a month. The family moves to an eccentric country house in The Four-Story Mistake . In Then There Were Five , the children befriend and eventually officially adopt an orphan boy down the road. My favorite of the series s the last one, Spiderweb for Two: A Melendy Maze, in which the three older siblings, leaving for school, design an elaborate treasure hunt to keep their younger siblings from being lonely. These books truly promote family love and friendship, compassion, and creativity.

A Little Princess is a beautiful, classic story which teaches little girls that it doesn’t matter whether you are dressed in rags or decked out in riches, it is what’s inside that makes a princess. Sara Crewe learns by harsh experience how differently one is treated when penniless, but her kind heart and cheerful attitude find her true, loyal friends.
Discussion: Is it easiest to see who one’s true friends are when one is poor and in trouble?

Nancy Belanger is a present day Catholic writer doing a phenomenal job writing for young girls. Olivia and the Little Way is an engaging, inspiring story about a fifth grade girl struggling with peer pressure who finds a friend and helper in St. Therese of Lisieux. This book has the potential to transform young lives through an introuction to the Little Way.

George MacDonald was a great writer who inspired J. R. R. Tolkien, and the old but good classic The Princess and the Goblin is a perfect introduction to his works for a young reader. The story is half fairy tale, half allegory, and completely charming. There are many gems of wisdom, such as the famous line, “Seeing is not believing… It is only seeing.” This story forms the sacramental imagination and a Christian worldview without being overtly preachy.

Beorn the Proud is a story of contrasts: proud Beorn the Viking and his humble captive Ness, and the Norse religion and Christianity, form an intriguing juxtaposition in this historical fiction novel from Madeleine Pollard. This book both informs about the Viking lifestyle and offers an example of apologetics in action.

Caddie Woodlawn is a collection of anecdotes about irrepressible, red-haired Caddie and her siblings’ scrapes and adventures on their family farm in frontier America. Throughout the stories runs a theme of growing up, and what it really means to be a woman of character.
Discussion: What virtues would the ideal woman show? Can one be gentle and compassionate, but at the same time courageous and resolute?

Two young girls escape off a sinking ship in a lifeboat full of… babies? Baby Island by Carol Ryrie Brink may take the prize for most creative plot on this list. It is quite hilarious, of course, as the sisters struggle to corral and care for four babies while surviving on a deserted island. But this book is also inspiring, because these girls show cheerfulness, and an indomitable work ethic, and resourcefulness, and patience beyond their years.

Frances Burnett’s most popular book, The Secret Garden , is a beautifully written (get the unabridged edition!) English classic which follows young Mary, quite contrary, who finds redemption in a garden. There are wonderful instances of compassion, friendship, kindness, and patience throughout, and an overarching theme that people can change for the better- not just Mary, but her cousin, friends, and even a sour old man.

Grandma’s Attic Treasury by Arleta Richardson is a collection of humorous ancedotes that a grandma tells her grandchildren about her childhood in the pioner days. The stories usually impart a good lesson such as appreciating your siblings or forgiving a friend.

The Reb and the Redcoats by Constance Savery is a thought provoking historical fiction novel set in England during the American Revolution. Three personable British children befriend an American prisoner of war and gain a new perspective on the justice of the war. This book teaches important lessons about the cost of war to both sides involved, and how kindness and loyal friendship can build bridges between honorable men with opposing positions.

Also by Constancw Savery, Enemy Brothers is the captivating, moving story of Max, a boy stolen as a baby and raised to be a Nazi, who is suddenly returned to his real English family as World War II begins. Max learns the power of truth, goodness, and love to change hearts and minds as he struggles to decide where his loyalties lie.

Big Red, by Jim Kjelgaard, is a story of the love between a boy and a dog, the story of a poor boy overcoming the odds to win, and the story of an epic battle between the savage wilderness and the friendship of boy and dog. Yes, all in one book. This series, which includes Irish Red and Outlaw Red, is a must read, particularly for boys, for its depiction of bravery, loyalty, and friendship. Jim Kjelgaard was a prolific writer, and any books by him you can find in print are worth buying!

The Twenty-One Balloons is a fun and funny tale of a tired professor whose attempt at a solitary balloon voyage goes sorely awry. Somehow, he ends up in the wrong ocean with far too many balloons, and his fantastical tale of how this occurred is the substance of the book. Well written, this book inspires creativity and resourcefulness.

Brian Jacques’ Redwall and sequels are charming fantasy tales of an animal world where good and evil are very clearly defined and it is easy tell heroes from villains. Children, especially boys, love these books, and many reluctant readers can be coaxed into a love of reading by them.

Edith Nesbit’s books blend fantasy and everyday life in a captivating fashion. I think the worthwhile lesson for Catholic children is a recognition of the transcendence and the existence of things unseen. For example, the magical Psammead in Five Children and It and The Phoenix and the Carpet does not actually exist, but reading these books broadens the child’s imagination. The “magic” here is not the controversial sort of spells and witches found in Harry Potter, but rather of the genii in a bottle who grants wishes fairy tale variety.

All-of-a-Kind Family is a wonderful collection of anecdotes about a Jewish family with five daughters living in New York City at the turn of the twentieth century. This book is brimming with family warmth and love and a spirit of working together cheerfully. If your girls love this book, fortunately they can read more about Ella, Henny, Charlotte, Sarah, and Gertie in More All-Of-A-Kind Family.

Margaret Sydney’s Five Little Peppers and How They Grew is another American classic from the turn of the twentieth century. This story of a widowed mother and her five children working together to survive poverty and sickness is a classic because of the overwhelming love, loyalty, and willingness to sacrifice the members of the family shows for each other.

The Wheel on the School is a modern classic about children in a Dutch village who dream of bringing the storks back to nest in their village. This is a story of how dreams can come true through teamwork.
Discussion: Do you have a dream for making a difference in some way to share with your parents and family? How can we work together to accomplish this dream?

Adam of the Road is historical fiction set in thirteenth century England. Eleven year old Adam loses both his minstrel father and dog but with strong determination sets out across England to find them. A tale of perseverance.

For a bit of Irish history and adventure, read Red Hugh, Prince of Donegal . Hugh was a real Irishman whose capture, exciting escape, battle against the elements, and dramatic homecoming make for an engrossing story of courage and perseverance.

Snow Treasure is an inspiring true story about a group of brave Norwegian children who sled over nine milllion dollars in gold safely past the Nazis and out of their country.

First Farm in the Valley is the story of a Polish immigrant family living in the midwest in pioneer days. There is a wealth of Polish Catholic tradition in these heart warming anecdotes about family, friendship, and faith.

Historical fiction with an animal twist, SeaMan: The Dog Who Explored The West With Lewis & Clark is an enjoyable account of Lewis and Clark’s exploration as told by their huge Newfoundland, Seaman. A story of courage and loyalty.

Robert Lawson “discovered, edited, and illustrated” some remarkable accounts of American patriots, as written by their pets. Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin Franklin by His Good Mouse Amos and Mr. Revere and I: Being an Account of certain Episodes in the Career of Paul Revere,Esq. as Revealed by his Horse are two of these hilarious, informative stories of inspiring Americans.

By the wonderful authoress Lois Lenski, Strawberry Girl is the story of a family struggling to make a home in central Florida in the early twentieth century. There are so many good themes: forgiveness, loving your enemy and neighbor, especially when they’re the same person, and redemption.

Augustine Came to Kent is half saint biography, half historical fiction. Through the eyes of British born Wolf, the reader watches St. Augustine of Canterbury’s mission to restore Catholicism to England in the sixth century.

Calico Bush is historical fiction set during the French and Indian War about a young French indentured servant. Marguerite has to promise to serve a hostile English family for seven years in exchange for food and shelter, but her kindness, resourcefulness, and courage win them over.
Discussion: Is it right for a person to promise to serve another in exchange for basic necessities? Is this like slavery? Or is it a good solution for an orphan? What would your solution be?

By the Great Horn Spoon! by Sid Fleischman is a humorously told look at the California Gold Rush. Twelve year old Jack and his faithful butler go west in search of gold to save his aunt from losing her house. Courage, loyalty, and laugh out loud fun abound in this adventurous tale.

Paddle-to-the-Sea is a wonderfully illustrated book that combines a wealth of information about the geography of the great lakes with an entertaining story about a wooden man traveling to the sea. An award winning classic that has the potential to awaken an interest in geography.

If All the Swords in England: A Story of Thomas Becket follows two brothers, one in the service of Henry II and one a scribe for Thomas Becket, to examine the character of the two men and follow the events leading to the infamous cathedral martyrdom. An inspiring story of courage and loyalty.

The Great Wheel is historical fiction about a young Irish immigrant who becomes involved in the construction of the first Ferris Wheel. Robert Lawson’s illustrations are always enjoyable, as is this story about perseverance and industriousness.

Turn Homeward, Hannalee is a historical fiction novel based on true events involving a southern mill town. Hannalee is determined to make her way back home to Georgia from the northern mill at which she had been forced to work. A story of courage and perseverance, and also a great book for discussing the War between the States.
Discussion: Were both North and South hurt by the war? Why did the South want to leave the United States? Should they have been allowed to according to the Consitution?

To round out perception of the Civil War issues by offering a slave’s perspective, read Freedom Train: The Story of Harriet Tubman. This is an inspiring true story of a courageous woman.

Toliver’s Secret is an inspiring Revolutionary War story about a timid girl who must rise to the occasion and deliver an important message to George Washington. This book will resonate both with the timid and the adventurous child as Ellen finds her courage and sucessfully delivers her message.

Johnny Tremain is another Revolutionary War historical fiction story, this time about a boy with a crippled hand who rides as a messenger for several famous patriots such as Paul Revere and John Adams. An interesting look at the founding fathers, combined with a theme of working through disability, makes this a worthwhile read.

World War II is a fascinating period for children to read about. North to Freedom by Danish author Ann Holm is a thought provoking look at what experiencing everyday life might be like for a boy who grew up in a concentration camp. The book’s original title in Europe was I am David, and the movie of the same name is excellent too.

Number the Stars is another story about the Danish resistance in World War II. A ten year old girl and her family exhibit courage and sacrifice through their determination to save their Jewish friends.

Treasures of the Snow is a touching story that illustrates actions have consequences, bitterness breeds more bitterness, and forgiveness is freedom. This and other books by Patricia St. John have beautiful Christian themes. Keep in mind that these books are more evangelical Protestant in their message than Catholic, though. Rejoice in the overall Christian message, but be prepared to discuss differences between Catholicism and Protestantism with your child.
Discussion: Challenge your child to find examples of Protestant theology versus Catholic in the book. Is there more to Christianity than simply acknowledging Jesus as savior?

The Moffats by Eleanor Estes is a mid twentieth century classic about the adventures a somewhat chaotic family of imaginative, active children. Humorous and entertaining, themes of family love and sibling loyalty make this book memorable.

Homer Price is a story about a happier, simpler era when a donut machine was an exciting and difficult invention. Truly a hilarious story, complete with Robert McCloskey’s humorous illustrations, this book encourages both creativity and critical thinking.

Both humorous and inspiring, The Toothpaste Millionaire is about a pair of sixth graders who start a toothpaste business and through a combination of hard work and creative vision enjoy amazing success.

If you are fortunate to be able to find a copy, Fr. James Tierney’s Bush Boys on the Move and the other books in his Bush Boys Series are wonderful adventures about a group of children exploring the Australian bush.

Owls in the Family by Farley Mowat is his whimsical account of growing up with two pet owls in a small town. Mowat is a well known nature writer and his books are great for inspiring appreciation for nature and animals.

If you have a 10 year old boy who just plain refuses to read, offer him The Adventures of Tintin. Suddenly, you will have a voracious reader. Almost guaranteed. These classic graphic novels captivate boys (and girls) with their exciting adventures.
Warning: These books do include a certain amount of drinking and some creative curses such as “Billions of Blue Blistering Barnacles in a Thundering Typhoon.” The alcohol use is portrayed in a negative light and frowned on by the hero.

Charlotte’s Web is a classic about a group of anamorphized animals. Justly a classic for its depiction of love, friendship, and death. However, it can be upsetting for a very sensitive child to think animals have this much feeling.
Discussion: Do animals really have feelings? Can a spider really be happy? What about a pig? A dog? What is happiness? Is it something specific to humans?

 

Also check out my list Good Graphic Novels and Comic Books for Catholic Kids.

Your children may also enjoy these book/movie pairings: Good Books for Catholic Kids that are also Good Movies.

Good Books for… Catholic 8 to 9 year olds 

There are so many wonderful children’s books for 8 to 9 year olds. They can enjoy reading for themselves many books read aloud to them at 6 or 7, but also have the excitement of reading new books for the first time by themselves. I still strongly believe in reading aloud to children at this age, so I will note some books on this list that may be more appropriate to read aloud. Also, children this age will enjoy hearing books on my family read alouds list.

The Ordinary Princess is the perfect princess story to teach ordinary girls that they can still be princesses. Her royal highness Princess Amethyst, or Amy as she prefers to be called, leaps from the pages, brown haired, freckled, and determined to go play in the woods rather than settle down to sewing tapestries. Amy learns about hard work, perseverance, simple pleasures and even finds true love with a prince as unusual as she is. The ordinary princess turns out to be an extraordinary person. Every little girl should read this book!

A Life of Our Lord for Children is a wonderful book by Marigold Hunt which will invite your child to meditate on the life of Christ. This book offers explanations of confusing parts of the Gospels, and is written in a friendly, conversational style.

Catechism of the Seven Sacraments is a great option for boys who are a bit resistant to sitting down and reading heavy theology! My son loves this comic book style version of the Catechism. This book is jam-packed full of gems of theology such as the Four Cups, Divine Mercy, and so much more!

Sixty Saints for Girls> is the Catholic saint version of princess tales for little girls. Joan Windham does not strive for historical accuracy, but rather to share legends and the essence of sainthood, which is serving God through heroic virtue. Girls will be inspired by these stories of female saints throughout the ages.

Sixty Saints for Boys is the boy equivalent of Windham’s book for girls. Again, talk to your children about how these stories are not meant to be taken as historically accurate in every detail, but rather as inspiring legends based on the facts of the saints holy lives.

An Extraordinary Friend: The Adventures of Jamie and Bella is the first in a series of exciting adventure stories written by a Catholic priest. They are fun to read, yet offer a Catholic perspective on every day events. Each book has thought-provoking questions at the end for your child to think about or discuss with a parent.

Freddy the Detective is a funny mystery featuring Freddy the Pig, the hero of a whole series of once popular and sadly forgotten children books. Freddy is inspired by Sherlock Holmes to attempt solving crimes, but finds the justice process more complex than he anticipated. This book introduces children to the concepts of justice, trials, and even jurisprudence. A wonderful read aloud, it is also possible for an 8 to 10 year old to read on their own. If you love Freddy, the literate pig, read more about him inFreddy Plays Football.

Loyola Kids Book of Heroes: Stories of Catholic Heroes and Saints throughout History is a wonderful book by Amy Welborn that will inspire your children with stories about modern saints and blesseds. For even more saints stories, check out its companion book Loyola Kids Book of Saints.

The Adventures of Pippi Longstocking, by the wonderful Swedish author Astrid Lindgren, is the story of funny, spunky, unnaturally. strong Pippi and her very normal friends Tommy and Anneka. Pippi is an orphan who lives alone and does just as she pleases, which is an interesting idea to a child, but behind the fun and adventures, Lindgren is careful to show how Pippi misses her parents and struggles to live a normal life without them. Their are also great themes of friendship, loyalty, generosity, cheerfulness, and kindness in these books.

A lesser known but in my opinion even more enjoyable series by Lindgren is The Children of Noisy Village. Nine year old Lisa will captivate your child with her stories of life in her tiny Swedish village. A great introduction to the country of Sweden and exposure to Swedish customs, and overall just a fun read. There are two further books about Noisy Village: Happy Times in Noisy Village and Christmas in Noisy Village .

Sid Fleischman’s The Whipping Boy was clearly inspired by Mark Twain’s The Prince and Pauper. It is a hilarious story of traded identities, unlikely friendship, and loyalty.

McBroom’s Wonderful One-Acre Farm: Three Tall Tales offers more hilarity from Sid Fleischman. McBroom and his large family find happiness in farm life on one miraculously fertile acre. Fanciful and fun, the cheerfulness and teamwork make these tall tales worthwhile reading.

Saint Brendan And The Voyage Before Columbus is a short book with the interesting tale of Saint Brendan, who legend says voyaged to America before Columbus. The moral is that all adventures can bring us closer to God.

Did you know that Ian Fleming of James Bond fame wrote one children’s book, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car? This fanciful adventure story about a car that can talk, fly, and sail and its mission to stop a gang of robbers is quite different than the storyline of the popular old movie with the same title, but I enjoyed the book more! This is a classic adventure of good versus evil, justice being achieved, and friendship.

The Betsy-Tacy Treasury: The First Four Betsy-Tacy Books are charming stories about the friendship and adventures of three little girls. These books follow Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from age 5 up through adulthood, so I would only recommend these first four books for 8 to 9 year olds.

A Lion to Guard Us is War for Independence (Revolutionary War) era historical fiction about three children venturing across the Atlantic Ocean in search of their father. Many good themes about perseverance, courage, and responsibility can be gleaned.

The Secret Valley is not just an interesting historical fiction story about the California gold rush. More importantly, it is a story about greed versus need, and wishes coming true in unexpected ways.

Lion in the Box by the wonderful Marguerite De Angeli, is a Christmas story about a poor family struggling to make ends meet. A good reminder for children that some people live in poverty, but still a happy ending thanks to an unexpected gift.

Another thought provoking book by Marguerite de Angeli, The Door in the Wall tells the story of Robin, a boy in the fourteenth century who loses the use of his legs. A monk rescues the boy and teaches him that life can still be meaningful for a cripple. This gem has so many good lessons about patience, courage, compassion, and hard work.

Almost everything by Marguerite de Angeli is worth reading, but I will limit my list to one more of her works. Skippack School tells about the life of a German immigrant boy starting school in America. As always with de Angeli, you get lovely illustrations and many good themes about hard work, patience, perseverance, and kindness.

The Family from One End Street is a collection of stories about the seven children of a large family living in small town America in the 1930’s. The family is very poor, but the lesson that money does not determine happiness shines forth in these funny, touching stories of large family life.

Lost in Peter’s Tomb is the first in a series of books by Catholic author Dianne Ahern that feature Sister Philomena, both nun and special investigator for the pope. Although I don’t love Ahern’s use of the present tense in her books, she does offer a wealth of information about Rome, the pope, Assisi, Siena, and many other Catholic tidbits that your child will not learn or retain as easily elsewhere. So, I consider these fun little mysteries worthwhile reading.

Beverly Cleary’s books have delighted children for a few generations now. There are a lot of titles, but Henry and Ribsy is one of my favorites because it is told from the dog’s perspective. Any animal lover is sure to love reading the touching story of Ribsy’s scrapes and delights. I do not recommend investing in all of Cleary’s books since I find her characters do not consistently show growth in virtue, but this book is worth reading.

“B” Is for Betsy is the first in a series of books written by Carolyn Haywood in the 1940’s but still relatable and enjoyable today. Children will connect with Betsy’s struggles and victories in starting school, making friends, and growing up. The children in these books show kindness, compassion, and friendship.

Carolyn Haywood also wrote a series featuring a boy, Penny, so nicknamed because his hair is red as a penny. Here’s a Penny is the first in this series about the adventures and struggles of this adopted boy. Again, you get children who show kindness and true friendship in these sweet stories.

Alice Dagleish wrote two wonderful books about the nature of courage, one featuring a boy and one a girl. The Courage of Sarah Noble is the story of little Sarah’s journey through the forest with her father to find a new home, and her gradual discovery that courage is not a lack of fear, but rather bravery in the midst of fear.

Boys will particularly identify with Jonathan in Dagleish’s The Bears on Hemlock Mountain as he sets out alone across the mountain to fetch a pot from his aunts house. He shows courage and perseverance on his trek and proves that there are indeed bears on hemlock mountain.

Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle understands children because she likes them! She is the grandma-figure extraordinaire whose house is children’s heaven, and always has sage advice for overwhelmed parents. Tucked in these humorous tales are morals children will glean: don’t be a picky eater, listen to your parents, clean up your room, and so on.

The Happy Hollisters is the first in a long series of mysteries featuring the Hollister family. Each book features the large Hollister family who exemplify cheerfulness and teamwork as they help others by solving mysteries. I strongly believe mysteries are important for children to read becuse they instill a strong thirst for justice and interest in problem solving.

The Boxcar Children Books 1-4 are fun, easy to read mysteries about four siblings, Henry, Jessie, Violet and Bennie. The later books in the series fall off greatly in quality, but the original books by Gertrude Warner from the 1940s are enjoyable classic children’s stories of a simpler life in the first half of the twentieth century before computers and cell phones. There are good lessons about responsibility, perseverance, resourcefulness, and kindness. Prepare to be amazed at the ingenuity of four children making a home in an old boxcar. Journey with the Aldens to Surprise Island for a unique tropical vacation and find a castaway. These were my very favorite books at this age!

Mr. Popper’s Penguins is an American classic about Mr. Popper, a housepainter, and the escepades of his penguins. Funny and touching both, this is a book about dreams coming true, showing both the good and bad consequences.

The Bobbsey Twins In and Out and its sequels are fun mystery stories featuring two sets of twins. They provide a picture of middle class life in the first half of the twentieth century, complete with African American servants, so a gentle discussion about that subject would be appropriate before handing this over for your children to enjoy.