Review of “Girl Saints for Little Ones”

If you are looking for a simple, beautiful introduction to popular female saints, check out Kimberly Fries’ Girl Saints for Little Ones and Girl Saints for Little Ones Volume 2!

Each volume features a dozen saints, mostly well-known heroines of our faith like Saint Rose of Lima, Saint Kateri, Saint Agnes, and Saint Gianna. These books do not include dates or feast days, instead focusing on details about the saints’ lives that little ones are more likely to grasp and retain, such as family relationships, feeding the poor, and miracles. This makes these books great for a cursory introduction, but if you are looking for more in-depth information about the saints, consider the Life of a Saint series from Ignatius,or other saint biographies featured inMy Book Lists.

Each saint page concludes with an inspiring quote from each saint about following Jesus and living a strongly Christian life. For example, the quote from St. Claire of Assisi is: “Totally love Him, who gave Himself totally for your love.”

What makes these books shine are the beautiful original paintings for each saint which will capture the attention of young children. Each painting contains a special symbol the child can associate with the saint. Some symbols are the traditional ones, such as the lamb of Saint Agnes. Others are original, such as green seeds to show the seeds of faith Saint Kateri sowed in the New World.

There is also a brother book, Boy Saints for Little Ones. This book features a dozen inspiring male saints such as Saint Augustine, Saint Maximilian Kolbe, and Saint Patrick.

Overall, these books make a worthwhile addition to any Catholic family’s library. For more great Catholic books about the saints, the Blessed Mother, and more, check out my list Good Catholic Books for Catholic Preschoolers and Kindergartners !

Beyond Narnia: More Great Fantasy Series for Catholic Kids and Teens

What kid doesn’t love The Chronicles of Narnia? As an 8-12 year old, it was one of my favorite series, and I still enjoy re-reading it as an adult.

The question is: what to read after Narnia? What other fantasy books can satisfy after such a wonderful series?

This question is particularly tricky given the murkiness about magic, magical powers, witches, and sorcerers commonly found in popular contemporary fantasy series. More insidious but even more harmful is the dualism and Gnostic worldview often normalized in fantasy series.

But don’t lose hope! Today I bring you an entire list of wholesome series for your kids and teens to devour after finishing Narnia.


The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander tell a wonderful coming of age story and adventure. Over the course of the five books, a young man named Taran grows from being a rebellious teen to a valiant and courageous warrior, in the process forging friendships, finding love, and helping save a kingdom.
Recommended for 10 and older.


It is hard to be surpass On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness and its sequels in The Wingfeather Saga in the category of edge of your seat fantasy adventure. Check out my Review of the Wingfeather Saga for plot summary, discussion points, praise, and cautions.
Recommended for 12 and older.


Redwall by Brian Jacques has delighted generations of children with its amusing animal heroes, high feasts, and epic battles. This series is satisfyingly long: a whopping 22 books. Some of the later volumes drag, but be sure and buy the first six books at least, which are excellent!
Recommended for 10 and older.


In the Hall of the Dragon King is the first of Stephen Lawhead’s Dragon King Trilogy. Complete with heroic quests, giant serpents, fair maidens to rescue, and a chilling necromancer to defeat, this series is guaranteed to please fantasy lovers. But it also has a solid plot, well-developed characters, and a Christian worldview.
Recommended for 12 and older.


The Green Ember Series by S. D. Smith is a Narnia-like series of epic adventure and talking animals that gets bonus points for being written with a clearly Christian world view. Best of all, it is free to download as an Ebook so you can preview it before deciding whether to buy a paper copy.
Recommended for 10 and older.


E. Nesbit’s classic children’s books that blend magic, adventure, family, and outdoor fun are coming back into print. Five Children and It and The Phoenix and the Carpet are just two of her many fine books, which make great read-alouds or independent reads.
Recommended for 8 and older.


The Ruins of Gorlan is the first book in John Flanagan’s captivating 12 volume Ranger’s Apprentice Series. These exciting tales follow teenage Will and his friends as they grow from impulsive teens into capable adults. Battling evil creatures, they learn to rely on one another. Each possessing a different talent, they must learn to cooperate. The characters do grow older during hte series, so this is a great series to dole out a book at a time as your child gets older.
First book recommended for 10 and older.


Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis are the clear must-reads on this list in my opinion. Similar to Narnia in that they are allegorical, they are written for an adult audience and explore deeper questions about creation, the nature of man, and the will for power.
Recommended for 14 and older.

    
To conclude with the master, everything by J. R. R. Tolkien is naturally recommended for fantasy fans. The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings Trilogy should be a part of any home library. Don’t forget The Silmarillion and The Great Tales of Middle-earth also! They provide fascinating details about the making of middle earth and the tales of many of the heroes mentioned in passing in the Lord of the Rings.


Good Easy Readers for Catholic Kids

Have an emergent reader in the family? By definition, the text in an easy reader has to be very simple, but that’s no reason for the illustrations to be poor quality! Here are some great options of both readers from programs and fun, simple books which combine short and sweet stories with good quality illustrations. We use a combination of both types of books to provide plenty of practice for our young readers.

Note that these books are intended for emergent readers; if you have a child who is already reading chapter books fluently, check out my list Good Books for Catholic 8 to 9 year olds .

Books from Reading Programs


The All About Reading beginner readers are favorites at our house. There are several books in the series such as Run, Bug, Run!, The Runt Pig, and Cobweb the Cat. These are quality hardcover books which each include a whole collection of funny stories. Note that some older, used editions may be in black and white, so opt for a newer version if you want a color edition.

 

 

 


Seton Press has reprinted the Faith and Freedom Readers, a series of beautiful readers beginning with This is Our Family. These charmingly illustrated stories are sight-word style reading, which I find helpful to include along with the phonics-based books we typically use. Cheapest place to buy is from Seton directly: This is Our Family.

 

 

 


Speaking of sight words, remember Dick and Jane? Here is a great set of four beautiful hard-cover reprints of the classic Dick and Jane stories. These short, simple stories quickly inspire confidence in young readers.

 

 

 


The Little Angel Readers are part of a phonics based program available at Stone Tablet Press, but they can be used independently of the program for simple practice. They feature short, easy stories ranging from retellings of folk and fairy tales to Catholic-themed stories.

 

 

 

For Fun

We love The Princess Twins Series with their sweet illustrations, simple stories, and marvelous messages. Each story highlights a different virtue which Princesses Emma and Abby learn to model.

 

 

 

 

 


We all laugh at the adventures and misadventures of Charlie the Ranch Dog in these easy readers inspired by the Ree Drummond books.

 

 

 

 

 


Arnold Lobel’s popular Frog and Toad books make great easy readers. We also enjoy his other stories such as Small Pig and Owl at Home.

 

 

 

 

 

I dislike the illustrations in many of the Dr. Seuss beginner books, but others like these two by Mike McClintock are actually quite charming: Stop that Ball! and A Fly Went by .

 

 

 

 

 


Biscuit. Okay, yes, it is ironic that the title character’s name is not actually an easy word to read. But otherwise, these adorable books are very, very basic on the vocabulary with big font and only a sentence or two a page. We love the sweet illustrations in these stories.

 

 

 

Cynthia Rylant has written several great series of easy readers. Our favorites are the Mr. Putter & Tabby stories. Not only do these books offer lessons about friendship and kindness, they show children that elderly people can be funny, happy, sad, or lonely too. You will love kind-hearted Mr. Putter and his fine cat Tabby, and smile at his eccentric neighbor Mrs. Teaberry and her crazy dog Zeke.

 

 


We also find Cynthia Rylant’s Poppleton stories funny and enjoyable.

 

 

 

 

For Information


Have a facts-oriented child? Consider the DK Eyewitness Readers. They feature high-quality photos and four different levels of difficulty to choose from, and are available on a multitude of subjects. Most libraries have lots of these!

Good Picture Books about Lent and Easter for Catholic Kids

Thinking about Easter yet? Or concentrating on participating in Lent to the fullest? Here are some wonderful books to assist all ages in entering into these seasons of penitence and rejoicing.


The Story of Easter is a sweet little board book for the smallest children. It ties together spring, new life, and Jesus rising from the dead neatly, stressing that Easter is really about Jesus loving us through his death and resurrection.

 

 

 

 


The Easter Cave tells the Easter story in a simple, rhythmic style inspired by “The House that Jack Built.”

 

 

 

 

 


In The Easter Swallows, children see the Passion and Resurrection through the eyes of two kind little swallows.

 

 

 

 

 


The Legend of the Easter Robin: An Easter Story of Compassion and Faith is a charming story about compassion and trusting God. A little girl learns to trust God through uncertainty as her Grandmother teaches her the legend of the Easter robin.

 

 


There are many great versions of the Stations of the Cross for Children. Here is wonderful one for ages 5-10 from Word Among Us Press: Walking with Jesus to Calvary: Stations of the Cross for Children. For each station, there is a description of what happened, then a personal prayer to encourage the child to speak straight to Jesus.

 

 

 

 


Little Colts Palm Sunday is the perfect story to read on Palm Sunday. The author fancifully imagines Palm Sunday through the eyes of the colt that carried Jesus into Jerusalem.

 

 

 

 


Also perfect to begin on Palm Sunday, The Easter Story Egg is a book and nesting egg. Each day between Palm Sunday and Easter, your family opens an egg and reads the accompanying Bible verses and meditation.

 

 


Looking for the Easter story as recounted in the Gospels? Fiona French’s beautiful book Easter may be the perfect fit. She uses colorful pictures inspired by stained glass windows to bring the Passion and Resurrection to life in a luminous way.

 

 

 

 


Little Rose of Sharon is a poignant story which explores themes about true beauty and self-sacrifice. A vain little rose eventually chooses to give up all her beautiful petals to keep an egg warm, thus imitating the total self-sacrifice of Jesus on the cross.

 

 

 

 


In this folktale retold, three trees dream about their future. Each tree finds its dreams achieved, but in a different way than they ever could have expected.The Tale of Three Trees is a lesson in divine providence and self-sacrifice.

 

 

 

 


Rechenka’s Eggs is a story about giving, friendship, and how eggs are a sign of the miracle of new life.

Good Books about Princesses for Catholic Girls of All Ages

Did you know many Catholic saints were princesses? Sadly, in recent years, the word “princess” has become synonymous with a spoiled or arrogant girl. But for centuries, the word “princess” connoted a young lady who exhibits beauty both interior and exterior, grace, kindness, wisdom, and self-control. I am a proponent of resurrecting the image of the virtuous princess as a positive role model for our daughters. Because what little girl doesn’t instinctively admire a princess? So let’s read them stories about the type of princess we want them to emulate. Here are some great stories about real princesses for girls of all ages.

PICTURE BOOKS


St. Elizabeth of Hungary is a Catholic saint and queen who truly exhibited charity through her great love of the poor. Roses in the Snow is a beautiful picture book about this beautiful soul.

 

 

 

 


Little Gold Star: A Spanish American Cinderella Tale is a creative Spanish American version of Cinderella which features Mary as the “godmother” who helps the young girl.

 

 

 

 


The Princess and the Kiss is a wonderful story about cherishing the gift of purity. I love how the king and queen in the story guide their princess to develop virtues! Also check out the sequel, The Three Gifts of Christmas, which describes how the princess is cured of her selfishness.

 

 


Girl Saints for Little Ones and its sequel Girl Saints for Little Ones Volume 2 feature several Catholic princesses and queens who were saints such as St. Catherine of Alexandria, St. Clothilde, and St. Elizabeth of Hungary.

 

 

 

For more classic Princess fairy tales such as Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, and more, check out my book list Good Fairy Tales, Fables, and Tall Tales for Catholic Kids!

 

FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLERS


I was thrilled to discover the Twin Princess series at our local library recently. These sweet little easy readers offer great lessons for little girls. In The Princess Twins and the Tea Party, Princess Abby learns a lesson in humility as her sister Princess Emma reminds her: “Only God is perfect!” And in The Princess Twins and the Puppy, Abby learns a lesson in trusting God.

 

 


The Queen and the Cats is a retelling of little known legend about St. Helena, Queen mother of Constantine and finder of the true Cross. After finding the Cross, legend has it that Helena visited Cypress and helped save their churches from the rats.

 

 

 


Once upon a Time Saints offers the stories of some lesser known saints who also happened to be princesses such as Alice, who trusted God and married two different kings. And Elizabeth of Portugal who was a great peacemaker and patron of the poor.

 

 

 


M. M. Kaye’s The Ordinary Princess was a favorite princess story of mine as a girl. Princess Amy’s godmother bestows on her the gift of being ordinary. At first this seems like an impossible gift to burden a princess with, but eventually Amy finds a prince who likes her exactly as she is- especially her ordinariness.

 

 

 

FOR TWEENS TO TEENS


The Princess and the Goblin and its sequel The Princess and Curdie are two classics from master storyteller George MacDonald. Princess Irene explores labyrinths with a magic ring, avoiding malicious Goblins with the help of Curdie, a simple miner boy.

 

 

 


The Light Princess is another George MacDonald story. A princess loses her gravity: both her ability to stay on the ground and her ability to be serious. She is insipid and carefree, and utterly selfish. Will even the prospect of her suitor dying rouse any compassion?

 

 

 


The Princess Guide: Faith Lessons from Snow White, Cinderella, and Sleeping Beauty brings together princess tales, scripture, and the Catechism of the Catholic church into simple lessons for teenage girls about the virtues and Catholic womanhood.

 

 

 


Catholic author Regina Doman’s series of fairy tale princess retellings are fun books with good themes for Catholic girls, if not necessarily memorable for their great prose. The Shadow of the Bear, the first book, is a retelling of Snow White and Rose Red. (Parental Warning: mention of date rape) Black as Night is a creative take on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs featuring friars as the dwarfs. Waking Rose is Sleeping Beauty retold, and the final book in Doman’s initial trilogy, which I would consider appropriate for about 14 and up. The Midnight Dancers is a retelling of the Twelve Dancing Princesses with a timeless theme about teenage rebellion, modesty, and obedience. (Parental Warning: mention of unwanted sexual advances, a torture scene, drug and alcohol use) Alex O’Donnell and the 40 Cyberthieves is Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, of course. Note that Doman’s latest book, Rapunzel Let Down, is meant for a much older audience.

FOR OLDER TEENS (18+)


Helena is Catholic author Evelyn Waugh’s biography of Saint Helena. This is a story of Helena’s quest for meaning, for love, for eternity. Also it an inspiring story of a woman who suffered many humiliations with great graciousness and channeled her sufferings into a search for eternal love.

 

 

 


Life of St. Margaret Queen of Scotland is a short, fascinating contemporaneous description of Saint Margaret by a bishop who knew her.

 

 

 

 


Queen Hereafter is a great historical fiction novel, also about Saint Margaret of Scotland. Author Susan Fraser King does a fantastic job with the historical details of this story, while also portraying Margaret as a believable, flawed woman striving to pursue virtue despite a difficult life.

 

 

 


Rapunzel Let Down is Regina Doman’s latest book, intended for a much older audience than her previous novels aimed at high schoolers. This is a very dark story of temptation, sin, and selfish love, juxtaposed to forgiveness, true love, and second chances. Only for readers over 18.

My 5 favorite children’s authors who also illustrate their books

One day, our then three year old daughter C was watching me read Homer Price to her older brother. When we finished the chapter, she went to the bookshelf and out of the confusion of several hundred picture books she carefully selected Blueberries for Sal, Make Way for Ducklings, and One Morning in Maine.

We were stunned that such a small child noticed McCloskey’s distinctive illustrations and correctly identified all the other McCloskey books we owned. Small children notice more than we think about picture books. The story is important, but so are beautiful illustrations! As St. John Paul II wrote in his Letter to Artists: “beauty is the visible form of the good.” Here are five authors who grasp this and personally pour effort both into crafting their story and creating artwork to accompany it.

1. Shirley Hughes is one of my absolute favorite children’s authors/illustrators. Not only are her distinctive illustrations carefully executed, they contain so many small details that little children delight in studying them. Her stories are always simple and engaging on the surface, but underneath they invariably present an age appropriate lesson. For example, Alfie Gets in First is a cautionary story about locking your parents out of the house. Moving Molly encourages children who are moving that there will be good aspects of their new homes. In Alfie and the Big Boys, Alfie exemplifies that even a small child can offer comfort and help to an older child. And Dogger is what I consider Hughes’ masterpiece: a tear-jerking tale of sibling love and sacrifice. Hughes also wrote one of my favorite book of children’s poetry:Out and About: A First Book of Poems.

 

2. Jan Brett‘s highly realistic and detailed illustrations are extremely popular right now, and I like most of her stories, though not all. One of my favorites is Fritz and the Beautiful Horses , a lovely story about a pony who realizes that being gentle and kind is more important than being physically beautiful. We also enjoy Annie and the Wild Animals, Town Mouse, Country Mouse and Cinders: A Chicken Cinderella. While I enjoy the illustrations in her Christmas themed books, I do not recommend them since she sadly promotes a heavily secularized view of Christmas.

 

3. Jane Hissey‘s endearing illustrations fittingly accompany the gentle adventures of a gang of stuffed animal friends in The Old Bear Collection. We love all her stories about Old Bear, Jolly Tall, Little Bear, Rabbit, and Bramwell!

 

 

 

 

4. Nick Butterworth is another English author whose stories we read with great appreciation. His stories, such as The Secret Path , star Percy the Park Keeper, a sweet-natured gardener who makes friends with all the animals in the park. The largest collection of Percy’s adventures, Percy the Park Keeper: A Classic Treasury, is out of print but can often be found in used condition quite cheaply.

 

 

5. To return to the anecdote I began with, my children all love Robert McCloskey‘s stories and illustrations. We also appreciate that not only does he draw illustrations for his simplest picture book, Blueberries for Sal, but he also includes fun illustrations in his chapter books like Homer Price.

Good Books for Catholic 12 to 13 Year Olds 

Tween to teen is a tricky age to pick books for, since they are looking for something challenging, but are not ready for mature content yet. I strongly believe in not overwhelming children in this age range by exposing them too early to classic literature that was intended for adults, so you will not find Charles Dickens or Jane Austen on this list. But you will find books by many other fun, age appropriate authors such as Meriol Trevor, L. M. Montgomery, and Father Francis Finn. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

L. M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables books are beautifully written, inspiring books for girls and young women, featuring the struggles, triumphs, growing pains, and dreams of Anne. These books are often introduced to children too early; I highly recommend waiting until at least age 12 for the first book. Cheerful, dreamy Anne grows up throughout the series, so do not make the mistake of handing your daughter the whole series at once! The first three books are appropriate for middle schoolers; save the rest for high school.
Discussion: What virtues come easily to Anne? What are her flaws? How does she strive to improve herself? Does God have an important part in Anne’s life? What is most important to Anne: God, friends, home, beauty?

J. R R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, the prequel to The Lord of the Rings, is a famous fantasy adventure both girls and boys enjoy. It may even inspire a reluctant reader to continue following the story of the ring in The Fellowship of the Ring: Being the First Part of The Lord of the Rings.
Discussion: Tolkien’s books are rife with Christian symbolism and allegory. If your child becomes a real Tolkien devotee, offer The Philosophy of Tolkien: The Worldview Behind the Lord of the Rings by Peter Kreeft as an in depth look at Tolkien’s Christian perspective.

Catholic author Meriol Trevor wrote a captivating adventure series for Catholic middle schoolers which begins with The Crystal Snowstorm. Set in the tiny, fictional, European Catholic country of Letzenstein, these books chronicle the involvement of Catherine, Paul, and other English children in the politics and future of the throne of Letzenstein. The maturity, responsibility, and courage these children show are a breath of fresh air, as is Trevor’s unabashed use of a Catholic culture, faith, and values. Good and bad characters are clearly defined, all people are valued, a cripple is a hero, family trumps politics; I love Meriol Trevor. There are three sequels: Following the Phoenix , Angel and Dragon , and The Rose and Crown.

A stand alone book by Meriol Trevor, The Rose Round is on the surface a simple story of unlikely friendship between a poor cook and her brother with the rich son and granddaughter of their employer. But in typical Trevor fashion, there are many themes under the surface: being handicapped, what is truly ugly versus truly beautiful, whether love is a gift or something earned, emotional abusive people, how hurt people hurt others.

The Light Princess is a fairy tale by master storyteller George MacDonald. Subtle humor, a lesson about selfishness, and a redemption theme elevate this simple story about a princess who lost her gravity (both types) to classic literature level.

Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women is, of course, an American classic. The famous story of the struggles and joys of four sisters raised by their widowed mother has delighted girls for generations. If your daughter loves this book, by all means offer the sequels Little Men and Jo’s Boys .

A more sober but still enjoyable duo of books by Alcott, Eight Cousins
and Rose in Bloom take a thoughtful look at the virtues and flaws in eight cousins first as children then as young adults. As is typical in Alcott books, recklessness and laziness results in misfortune, while hard work, perseverance, and faithfulness are rewarded.
Discussion: Which cousins does Rose admire and why? Does Charlie bring on his own misfortune? In our current age and country marrying a cousin is atypical, but in Rose’s time it was normal.

Jack and Jill is a lesser known novel by Alcott, but at least as wonderful as her more famous works. This is another thoughtful look at the long term consequences, good and bad, recklessness can have on the doer, the injured, their families, and a whole community. And also a simply fabulous story.
Discussion: How does Jill suffer for her recklessnes? How does the free forgiveness offered her change her? How does God bring good out of her carelessness?

An Old-Fashioned Girl, a stand alone novel by Alcott, has a timely message about peer pressure and staying true to one’s values even when others see them as outdated. The heroine discovers compromising her values in order to fit in doesn’t gain her real happiness.

Have a tween who doesn’t want to read saint books? Check out my review of Catholic comic book The Saints Chronicles.

Fr. Francis Finn understood boys, and his books reflect his belief that though your average school boy is not a saint, he should strive to be one. His books are school stories about boys and for boys, complete with humor, adventure, fights, friendship, and forgiveness, and are overall imbued with a deeply Catholic worldview. His most well known trilogy begins with Tom Playfair: Or Making a Start, which is a story of a mischievous boy whose energy, when properly channeled, becomes fervor for Christ. The series continues with Percy Wynn or Making a Boy of Him, in which Tom helps teach a boy raised by his sisters about manly virtues, and Harry Dee: Or Working it Out.

Outlaws of Ravenhurst is a captivating adventure about a Scottish Catholic clan’s struggle for freedom to worship during a Catholic persecution. This inspiring story makes real the challenges and amazing faith and courage displayed by Catholics facing martyrdom.
Note: These books will particularly resonate with boys, but girls love them too!

The Great and Terrible Quest was one of the most loved books in the large family I grew up in by both boys and girls. Young Trad, an orphan, risks his life to save and care for a wounded knight. The orphan and knight set out on a quest for something which the knight cannot remember. Bravery, sacrifice, love, redemption, and some fine storytelling make this story memorable.

The Good Bad Boy, by Fr. Brennan, is written as a diary detailing the everyday challenges and thoughts of a thirteen year old Catholic boy growing up in the mid twentieth century.

The Drovers Road Collection: Three New Zealand Adventures is an absolutely charming collection of anecdotes about a young girl growing up on a sheep farm in New Zealand. Often funny, sometimes touching, with nuggets of true wisdom, these stories told by the poignant voice of young Gabrielle carry the message that life may look different on the other side of the world, but people love and learn just the same.

The Sherwood Ring is a unique combination of modern day mystery and historical fiction, with a touch of romance for good measure. This is just a well written, well researched, fun read.

Fabiola is an inspiring story about the early church during the Roman persecutions. Fabiola is a convert to Christianity whose faith is tested by fire. Cameos by popular early saints such as Sebastian add a true story feel to this Christian historical fiction.

The Small War of Sergeant Donkey is World War II historical fiction focused in a unique location: the Alpine region of Italy held by American forces. Twelve year old Chico knows the Americans are supposed to be his enemies, but ends up befriending a soldier, whose life he later saves with some help from a heroic little donkey and a creative Catholic monk.

Cleared for Action!: Four Tales of the Sea is a collection of four books by Stephen Meader, a fine author of historical fiction. These tales of courage and fortitude span fifty years of American history, including the Civil War, and are particularly interesting for boys.

Midshipman Quinn: Collection is a collection of four humorous, adventurous stories about nerdy Septimus Quinn who joins the British Royal Navy at age 15 in 1803. These historical fiction tales are made memorable by Quinn’s quirky, resourceful, ever-loyal personality.

Little Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers is the first book in Ralph Moody’s masterful retelling of growing up in the western United States at the turn of the twentieth century. This series is in many ways a twentieth century equivalent of the Little House series. Moody has a captivating storytelling style which combines details about everyday life with an engaging overall plot. Our favorite books include The Home Ranch , in which Ralph spends a summer working as a hired hand on a ranch, and Shaking the Nickel Bush, in which a broke Ralph road trips through the west making money by sculpting bankers.

A majority of Catholic historical fiction focuses on male protagonists, so I am happy to add Madeleine Takes Command to this list. Teenage Madeleine shows true heroism as she takes command of the family stockade in New France and defends her people against the Iroquois.

The Red Keep is swashbuckling historical fiction set in twelfth century France. Young Conan is determined to save the Red Keep for its rightful owner, Lady Anne. Allen French writes enjoyable, engaging historical fiction. He also wrote The Story of Rolf and the Viking Bow, which is a wonderful Viking-era story with a moral about sacrifice and redemption.

G. A. Henty is, in my humble opinion, the gold standard when it comes to historical fiction. This prolific English author wrote dozens of novels intended to educate his teenage audience on wars, countries, cultures, history. My favorites include: Beric the Briton, A Story of the Roman Invasion, With Lee in Virginia, True to the Old Flag, <In the Heart of the Rockies: An Adventure on the Colorado River, and Cat of Bubastes.
Discussion: Henty is not afraid to take a controversial perspective and tell the other side of a story. For example, in True to the Old Flag, he offers the British perspective on the American Revolution. The theme to discuss would be that in a war, there are human beings on both sides who end up suffering.

For your Egyptian historical fiction, I recommend Shadow Hawk and Mara, Daughter of the Nile . Court secrets, espionage, danger, a touch of romance: these books will hold a reader’s attention and stick in their memory.

Across Five Aprils is civil-war era historical fiction about young Jethro, who comes of age amidst the conflict of the War Between the States.

The Trumpeter of Krakow is an absorbing novel set in 1490s Poland. This story offersman interesting combination of legend with the real fact that to this day the trumpet is played on the hour in Krakow.

In World War II historical fiction, Escape from Warsaw will please boys and girls with its brother-sister protagonists. Set in the chaos accompanying the end of the war, three children must use courage and cooperation to escape Warsaw and travel across Europe to rejoin their parents.

Rosemary Sutcliff’s historical fiction about Roman Briton are some of my favorite books to recommend. Sutcliff is both an enchanting storyteller and an excellent writer. You will leave with the feeling you have visited Briton and made a new cast of friends after reading The Eagle of the Ninth , The Silver Branch, and The Lantern Bearers .

Taken by the Enemy is first in a fascinating series in that Oliver Optic wrote it soon after the Civil War, thus offering a unique historical perspective. This story of a teenage boy attempting to recover his sister from the south on the eve of the war is a tale of courage and family loyalty.

Fingal’s Quest by Madeleine Polland is a great coming of age story set against the backdrop of Irish monastic life in the sixth century. There are great thought provoking themes about what doing God’s will really means.

The Red Badge of Courage is a very well known Civil War historical fiction novel about a young man’s experience fighting in the Union Army. Memorable for its depiction of the horror of war, it is also offers a good storyline of character development through the young man’s personal battle againt cowardice.

In the realm of animal fiction, The Yearling is a famous book with its timeless themes of growing up and sacrifices. A bit sad, but a classic every young person should read.

One of my absolute favorite authors in animal fiction, Albert Payson Terhune writes with such evident affection for his beloved collie chums the reader inevitably falls in love too. His most famous book is Lad: A Dog, but he wrote equally wonderful stories about his other collie friends such as Bruce, Treve, and Gray Dawn.

How’s Inky? is the first of naturalist Sam Campbell’s books about his animal friends of the forest. Campbell combines funny anecdotes with a down to earth philosophy of life in these very enjoyable books.

Old Yeller is an American classic, comparable to The Yearling with its themes of growing up and responsibility. This is a poignant, tear-jerking story of love, loyalty, and making tough, right decisions.

The Incredible Journey is another animal story, this time about three determined pets whose loyalty and perseverance are tested on a trans-Canadian journey to find their owner. This is the book that inspired Homeward Bound.

Another classic boy-dog growing up story, Where the Red Fern Grows is the famous story of Billy and his two hounds growing up together in the Ozarks. By turns tragic and hopeful, this book is certainly worth reading for its themes of hard work, courage, perseverance, and faith.

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell is the touching life story of a horse, as told by Black Beauty himself. This story is sure to delight any young horse lover.

Loved by generations, Lassie Come-Home tells a story of loyalty and perseverance as Lassie crosses Scotland to find her master.

Pollyanna should be read for culturL literacy, but sometimes is read too young. The drama of Pollyanna not being wanted is rather heavy content for a young child, so I prefer waiting until this age when the reader can better understand that Pollyanna’s hardships are used as a foil to highlight her cheerfulness in adversity.

Henry Reed, Inc. is a simply hilarious book by Robert McCloskey about quirky Henry and sensible Midge, two all-American kids with big schemes enjoying summer in small town USA. The best part of this book is the creativity and resourcefulness these kids show. No wasting time in front of the TV here!

The Weka-Feather Cloak: A New Zealand Fantasy is an exciting, colorful adventure story with a Catholic twist. Nuns, art, legend, demons, saints, a disabled girl, thieves, and angels all play a part in this creative story by Leo Madigan. Read more about this book in my Review of “The Weka-Feather Cloak”.

On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness is the first book in The Wingfeather Saga, a great option for fantasy-loving tweens and teens. Read my in-depth review here: .

Banner in the Sky is the story of Rudi, who wants to fulfill his dead father’s dream of climbing the treacherous mountain known as The Citadel. This story highlights perseverance and courage.

Also check out my lists Good Graphic Novels and Comic Books for Catholic KidsGood Books for Catholic Kids that are also Good Movies, and Good Catholic Books for Catholic Teens.

Good Books for… Catholic 8 to 9 year olds 

There are so many wonderful children’s books for 8 to 9 year olds. They can enjoy reading for themselves many books read aloud to them at 6 or 7, but also have the excitement of reading new books for the first time by themselves. I still strongly believe in reading aloud to children at this age, so I will note some books on this list that may be more appropriate to read aloud. Also, children this age will enjoy hearing books on my family read alouds list.

The Ordinary Princess is the perfect princess story to teach ordinary girls that they can still be princesses. Her royal highness Princess Amethyst, or Amy as she prefers to be called, leaps from the pages, brown haired, freckled, and determined to go play in the woods rather than settle down to sewing tapestries. Amy learns about hard work, perseverance, simple pleasures and even finds true love with a prince as unusual as she is. The ordinary princess turns out to be an extraordinary person. Every little girl should read this book!

A Life of Our Lord for Children is a wonderful book by Marigold Hunt which will invite your child to meditate on the life of Christ. This book offers explanations of confusing parts of the Gospels, and is written in a friendly, conversational style.

Catechism of the Seven Sacraments is a great option for boys who are a bit resistant to sitting down and reading heavy theology! My son loves this comic book style version of the Catechism. This book is jam-packed full of gems of theology such as the Four Cups, Divine Mercy, and so much more!

Sixty Saints for Girls> is the Catholic saint version of princess tales for little girls. Joan Windham does not strive for historical accuracy, but rather to share legends and the essence of sainthood, which is serving God through heroic virtue. Girls will be inspired by these stories of female saints throughout the ages.

Sixty Saints for Boys is the boy equivalent of Windham’s book for girls. Again, talk to your children about how these stories are not meant to be taken as historically accurate in every detail, but rather as inspiring legends based on the facts of the saints holy lives.

Prince Martin Wins His Sword is the first in an exciting adventure series that follows Prince Martin as he learns virtues, slays dragons, and protects the innocent. Read my full review here!

An Extraordinary Friend: The Adventures of Jamie and Bella is the first in a series of exciting adventure stories written by a Catholic priest. They are fun to read, yet offer a Catholic perspective on every day events. Each book has thought-provoking questions at the end for your child to think about or discuss with a parent.

Freddy the Detective is a funny mystery featuring Freddy the Pig, the hero of a whole series of once popular and sadly forgotten children books. Freddy is inspired by Sherlock Holmes to attempt solving crimes, but finds the justice process more complex than he anticipated. This book introduces children to the concepts of justice, trials, and even jurisprudence. A wonderful read aloud, it is also possible for an 8 to 10 year old to read on their own. If you love Freddy, the literate pig, read more about him inFreddy Plays Football.

Loyola Kids Book of Heroes: Stories of Catholic Heroes and Saints throughout History is a wonderful book by Amy Welborn that will inspire your children with stories about modern saints and blesseds. For even more saints stories, check out its companion book Loyola Kids Book of Saints.

The Adventures of Pippi Longstocking, by the wonderful Swedish author Astrid Lindgren, is the story of funny, spunky, unnaturally. strong Pippi and her very normal friends Tommy and Anneka. Pippi is an orphan who lives alone and does just as she pleases, which is an interesting idea to a child, but behind the fun and adventures, Lindgren is careful to show how Pippi misses her parents and struggles to live a normal life without them. Their are also great themes of friendship, loyalty, generosity, cheerfulness, and kindness in these books.

A lesser known but in my opinion even more enjoyable series by Lindgren is The Children of Noisy Village. Nine year old Lisa will captivate your child with her stories of life in her tiny Swedish village. A great introduction to the country of Sweden and exposure to Swedish customs, and overall just a fun read. There are two further books about Noisy Village: Happy Times in Noisy Village and Christmas in Noisy Village .

Sid Fleischman’s The Whipping Boy was clearly inspired by Mark Twain’s The Prince and Pauper. It is a hilarious story of traded identities, unlikely friendship, and loyalty.

McBroom’s Wonderful One-Acre Farm: Three Tall Tales offers more hilarity from Sid Fleischman. McBroom and his large family find happiness in farm life on one miraculously fertile acre. Fanciful and fun, the cheerfulness and teamwork make these tall tales worthwhile reading.

Saint Brendan And The Voyage Before Columbus is a short book with the interesting tale of Saint Brendan, who legend says voyaged to America before Columbus. The moral is that all adventures can bring us closer to God.

Did you know that Ian Fleming of James Bond fame wrote one children’s book, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car? This fanciful adventure story about a car that can talk, fly, and sail and its mission to stop a gang of robbers is quite different than the storyline of the popular old movie with the same title, but I enjoyed the book more! This is a classic adventure of good versus evil, justice being achieved, and friendship.

The Betsy-Tacy Treasury: The First Four Betsy-Tacy Books are charming stories about the friendship and adventures of three little girls. These books follow Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from age 5 up through adulthood, so I would only recommend these first four books for 8 to 9 year olds.

A Lion to Guard Us is War for Independence (Revolutionary War) era historical fiction about three children venturing across the Atlantic Ocean in search of their father. Many good themes about perseverance, courage, and responsibility can be gleaned.

The Secret Valley is not just an interesting historical fiction story about the California gold rush. More importantly, it is a story about greed versus need, and wishes coming true in unexpected ways.

Lion in the Box by the wonderful Marguerite De Angeli, is a Christmas story about a poor family struggling to make ends meet. A good reminder for children that some people live in poverty, but still a happy ending thanks to an unexpected gift.

Another thought provoking book by Marguerite de Angeli, The Door in the Wall tells the story of Robin, a boy in the fourteenth century who loses the use of his legs. A monk rescues the boy and teaches him that life can still be meaningful for a cripple. This gem has so many good lessons about patience, courage, compassion, and hard work.

Almost everything by Marguerite de Angeli is worth reading, but I will limit my list to one more of her works. Skippack School tells about the life of a German immigrant boy starting school in America. As always with de Angeli, you get lovely illustrations and many good themes about hard work, patience, perseverance, and kindness.

The Family from One End Street is a collection of stories about the seven children of a large family living in small town America in the 1930’s. The family is very poor, but the lesson that money does not determine happiness shines forth in these funny, touching stories of large family life.

Lost in Peter’s Tomb is the first in a series of books by Catholic author Dianne Ahern that feature Sister Philomena, both nun and special investigator for the pope. Although I don’t love Ahern’s use of the present tense in her books, she does offer a wealth of information about Rome, the pope, Assisi, Siena, and many other Catholic tidbits that your child will not learn or retain as easily elsewhere. So, I consider these fun little mysteries worthwhile reading.

Beverly Cleary’s books have delighted children for a few generations now. There are a lot of titles, but Henry and Ribsy is one of my favorites because it is told from the dog’s perspective. Any animal lover is sure to love reading the touching story of Ribsy’s scrapes and delights. I do not recommend investing in all of Cleary’s books since I find her characters do not consistently show growth in virtue, but this book is worth reading.

“B” Is for Betsy is the first in a series of books written by Carolyn Haywood in the 1940’s but still relatable and enjoyable today. Children will connect with Betsy’s struggles and victories in starting school, making friends, and growing up. The children in these books show kindness, compassion, and friendship.

Carolyn Haywood also wrote a series featuring a boy, Penny, so nicknamed because his hair is red as a penny. Here’s a Penny is the first in this series about the adventures and struggles of this adopted boy. Again, you get children who show kindness and true friendship in these sweet stories.

Alice Dagleish wrote two wonderful books about the nature of courage, one featuring a boy and one a girl. The Courage of Sarah Noble is the story of little Sarah’s journey through the forest with her father to find a new home, and her gradual discovery that courage is not a lack of fear, but rather bravery in the midst of fear.

Boys will particularly identify with Jonathan in Dagleish’s The Bears on Hemlock Mountain as he sets out alone across the mountain to fetch a pot from his aunts house. He shows courage and perseverance on his trek and proves that there are indeed bears on hemlock mountain.

Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle understands children because she likes them! She is the grandma-figure extraordinaire whose house is children’s heaven, and always has sage advice for overwhelmed parents. Tucked in these humorous tales are morals children will glean: don’t be a picky eater, listen to your parents, clean up your room, and so on.

The Happy Hollisters is the first in a long series of mysteries featuring the Hollister family. Each book features the large Hollister family who exemplify cheerfulness and teamwork as they help others by solving mysteries. I strongly believe mysteries are important for children to read because they instill a strong thirst for justice and interest in problem solving. Check out my full review of this series here!

The Boxcar Children Books 1-4 are fun, easy to read mysteries about four siblings, Henry, Jessie, Violet and Bennie. The later books in the series fall off greatly in quality, but the original books by Gertrude Warner from the 1940s are enjoyable classic children’s stories of a simpler life in the first half of the twentieth century before computers and cell phones. There are good lessons about responsibility, perseverance, resourcefulness, and kindness. Prepare to be amazed at the ingenuity of four children making a home in an old boxcar. Journey with the Aldens to Surprise Island for a unique tropical vacation and find a castaway. These were my very favorite books at this age!

Mr. Popper’s Penguins is an American classic about Mr. Popper, a housepainter, and the escepades of his penguins. Funny and touching both, this is a book about dreams coming true, showing both the good and bad consequences.

The Bobbsey Twins In and Out and its sequels are fun mystery stories featuring two sets of twins. They provide a picture of middle class life in the first half of the twentieth century, complete with African American servants, so a gentle discussion about that subject would be appropriate before handing this over for your children to enjoy.

Good Books for… Catholic 6 to 7 year olds

Although children are starting to read on their own by age 6 to 7, I cannot emphasize enough the importance of still reading aloud to them. For most children in this age range, their reading level will lag behind their comprehension level. Reading aloud bridges the gap and provides them with more complex ideas and themes to mull over then they would otherwise receive. Of course, reading aloud also provides a perfect opportunity to discuss the books! So you’ll find two lists here, really: one to read aloud and one for your child to read alone. For a particularly advanced reader or listener, I recommend checking out my list Good Books for… Catholic 8 to 9 year olds .

Books to Read Aloud

The Squire and the Scroll and its counterpart for girls The Princess and the Kiss: A Story of God’s Gift of Purity are two wonderful books about purity written specifically for Catholic children. These books talk about purity of heart and body as a precious gift from God and how one must resist temptations to impurity. These two books provide a gentle introduction to purity that even our very young children need in this day and age.

The Kitchen Knight: A Tale of King Arthur is a retelling by Margaret Hodges of a classic Arthurian legend of a humble knight rescuing a fair maiden. Complete with intricate and richly colored illustrations which will fascinate children, this story offers a glimpse into a world of chivalry, knighthood, and honor.

Margaret Hodges also has a retelling of Saint George and the Dragon with equally lavish illustrations. This retelling features a real fire-breathing dragon that George fights, but you can discuss with children how the
is story can be seen as an allegory of the fight against temptation and the devil. This story also offers a great lesson in perseverance as George continues his battle despite the seeming impossibility of his task.

Roses in the Snow: A Tale of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary tells your child the story of Saint Elizabeth complete with gorgeous illustrations.

Catholic Tales for Boys and Girls is an awesome book from modern day mystic Carryll Houselander. This is the first in a series of stories that explain Christ’s suffering and redemption to young children through simple stories.

The “Life of a Saint” series provides engagingly illustrated and engagingly written biographies of famous saints from Francis: The Poor Man of Assisi to Mother Teresa: The Smile of Calcutta.

Saints Tell Their Stories is a collection of first-person narrative style lives of 26 well known saints. The text is simple enough that a more advanced reader might be able to tackle this independently.

Christian Liberty Nature Reader Book 1 and its sequels are simply written stories about all sorts of living things. The authors’ intent is to awaken the child’s interest in and sense of wonder at God’s creation.

The Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook is a collection of stories featuring Milly-Molly-Mandy’s adventures and everyday dilemnas. Good discussion points are what virtues Milly-Molly-Mandy is showing, or occasionally not showing, in each story.

Although you may think The Complete Tales of Winnie-The-Pooh are too childish for a 6 or 7 year old, you may find your child enjoys them more at this age and will understand more of the humor. This book is a great opportunity to talk about the four temperaments. Is Rabbit choleric? Pooh phlegmatic? Tigger sanguine? Eeyore melancholic? (If you unfamiliar with the temperaments, check out The Temperament God Gave Your Kids: Motivate, Discipline, and Love Your Children!)

The Happy Little Family series chronicles episodes in the lives of an early American family, the Fairchilds. Beautifully written, with characters that jump off the page, these four books are very enjoyable read alouds with great lessons and vivid descriptions of nineteenth century life on a farm in Kentucky. For example, in a chapter of the first book, Happy Little Family , the father offers a special arrowhead for whichever of his children first shows true bravery. Stories like these provide great discussion themes: what is bravery or courage, are there different types of courage, how would your child act in the story, how could your child show courage in daily life?

The Happy Hollisters is the first in a long series of mysteries featuring the Hollister family. Each book features the large Hollister family who exemplify cheerfulness and teamwork as they help others by solving mysteries. These are not great classics of literature, but wholesome, simple, enjoyable books for if you are looking for a light read aloud.

The Boxcar Children Books 1-4 are fun, easy to read mysteries about four siblings which an advanced early reader could read on their own but are also great read alouds. The later books in the series fall off greatly in quality, but the original books by Gertrude Warner from the 1940s are enjoyable classic children’s stories, with good lessons about responsibility, perseverance, and kindness. Prepare to be amazed at the ingenuity of four children making a home in an old boxcar. Journey with the Aldens to Surprise Island for a unique tropical vacation and find a castaway. These were my very favorite books at this age!

Mr. Popper’s Penguins is an American classic about Mr. Popper, a housepainter, and the escepades of his penguins. Funny and touching both, this is a book about dreams coming true, showing both the good and bad consequences.

Books for your 6-7 year old to Read

I love the simple humor of Cynthia Rylant’s Mr. Putter and Tabby series. Not only do these books offer lessons in friendship and kindness, they show children that elderly people can be funny, happy, sad, or lonely too. You will love kind hearted Mr. Putter and his fine cat Tabby, and smile at his eccentric neighbor Mrs. Teaberry and her crazy dog Zeke. Some of our favorites are Mr. Putter & Tabby Walk the Dog and Mr. Putter & Tabby Pick the Pears.

For more easy readers for an emergent reader, check out my post Good Easy Readers for Catholic Kids!

The Billy And Blaze books chronicle the adventures of Billy and his pony Blaze at home in the country and on vacation in the west. Billy and Blaze explore lost trails, rescue dogs and calves in distress, and even save the country from a forest fire. These books encourage self reliance, bravery, perseverance, and friendship.

The Gospel Time-Trekkers series from Pauline Books and Media is a fun Catholic series for early readers.Shepherds to the Rescue (Gospel Time Trekkers) and its sequels chronicle the adventures of three children who travel back in time to encounter Jesus and the Gospel in a personal way.

Devotional Stories for Little Folks are simple stories about a modern day Catholic family. Each short chapter has a moral and discussion questions included. These stories  are also great to read aloud.

For a more advanced reader, The Littles is an imaginative story about a family of little people with tails living in the human world. This series abounds with ingenuous inventions and clever solutions to problems.

I also recommend checking out my list for 4-5 year olds for other books your 6-7 year old will enjoy practicing reading.

If you have a very early reader who is ready for more chapter books, move onto my list Good Books for… Catholic 8 to 9 year olds!