Beyond Narnia: More Great Fantasy Series for Catholic Kids and Teens

What kid doesn’t love The Chronicles of Narnia? As an 8-12 year old, it was one of my favorite series, and I still enjoy re-reading it as an adult.

The question is: what to read after Narnia? What other fantasy books can satisfy after such a wonderful series?

This question is particularly tricky given the murkiness about magic, magical powers, witches, and sorcerers commonly found in popular contemporary fantasy series. More insidious but even more harmful is the dualism and Gnostic worldview often normalized in fantasy series.

But don’t lose hope! Today I bring you an entire list of wholesome series for your kids and teens to devour after finishing Narnia.


The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander tell a wonderful coming of age story and adventure. Over the course of the five books, a young man named Taran grows from being a rebellious teen to a valiant and courageous warrior, in the process forging friendships, finding love, and helping save a kingdom.
Recommended for 10 and older.


It is hard to be surpass On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness and its sequels in The Wingfeather Saga in the category of edge of your seat fantasy adventure. Check out my Review of the Wingfeather Saga for plot summary, discussion points, praise, and cautions.
Recommended for 12 and older.


Redwall by Brian Jacques has delighted generations of children with its amusing animal heroes, high feasts, and epic battles. This series is satisfyingly long: a whopping 22 books. Some of the later volumes drag, but be sure and buy the first six books at least, which are excellent!
Recommended for 10 and older.


In the Hall of the Dragon King is the first of Stephen Lawhead’s Dragon King Trilogy. Complete with heroic quests, giant serpents, fair maidens to rescue, and a chilling necromancer to defeat, this series is guaranteed to please fantasy lovers. But it also has a solid plot, well-developed characters, and a Christian worldview.
Recommended for 12 and older.


The Green Ember Series by S. D. Smith is a Narnia-like series of epic adventure and talking animals that gets bonus points for being written with a clearly Christian world view. Best of all, it is free to download as an Ebook so you can preview it before deciding whether to buy a paper copy.
Recommended for 10 and older.


The Ruins of Gorlan is the first book in John Flanagan’s captivating 12 volume Ranger’s Apprentice Series. These exciting tales follow teenage Will and his friends as they grow from impulsive teens into capable adults. Battling evil creatures, they learn to rely on one another. Each possessing a different talent, they must learn to cooperate. The characters do grow older during hte series, so this is a great series to dole out a book at a time as your child gets older.
First book recommended for 10 and older.


Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis are the clear must-reads on this list in my opinion. Similar to Narnia in that they are allegorical, they are written for an adult audience and explore deeper questions about creation, the nature of man, and the will for power.
Recommended for 14 and older.

    
To conclude with the master, everything by J. R. R. Tolkien is naturally recommended for fantasy fans. The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings Trilogy should be a part of any home library. Don’t forget The Silmarillion and The Great Tales of Middle-earth also! They provide fascinating details about the making of middle earth and the tales of many of the heroes mentioned in passing in the Lord of the Rings.


Good Romances for Catholic Teens

Most teenage girls go through a stage of craving romance novels. Beware of letting your daughter even browse the romance section of your library these days though! She will be bombarded with sensual images on covers and graphic content within. Even many “Christian” romances are heavy on the sensuality and low on any sort of inspiring theme.

What should you look for in a romance for a Catholic teenager? There are the obvious “no’s”: no graphic sexual content, no positive portrayal of premarital sex, no living together before marriage, no dark drama about failing marriages. But a worthwhile romance is so much more than a list of “no’s.” Great romances showcase the true nature of love and humanity.

What is true love? It’s desiring the good of the other. Some of the greatest romances ever written explore this theme, like A Tale of Two Cities, in which Sydney Carton undergoes an incredible redemption and gives his life for the good of the woman he loves. Truly great romances will portray true love as selfless, giving, or redemptive. These type of romances often show the love between a man and woman as reflecting the love of God for us.

Is any human being perfect? Is love a feeling or a choice? Great romances do not portray the protagonists as perfect in every way. They often show that all people are imperfect, and forgiveness is the way to happiness. Or that true love isn’t just a magical feeling, but sticking together when life is tough and rekindling the flame of love in the face of adversity.

Are humans made for solitude or community? As much as we might sometimes envy the hero and heroine of Riders of the Purple Sage who push a boulder and cut off the rest of the world, this is not reality.  Worthwhile romances usually have greater depth than a simple boy-meets-girl-engagement-marriage story line. They examine relationships with family, community issues, world events, or other broader topics.

Fortunately for your teenage daughters, there are plenty of novels which combine love stories that range from passionate to funny with worthwhile themes.

Here are a few of my favorite novels for teens that have themes about true romance and love.


The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy is such a wonderful combination of adventure, intrigue, and romance. This classic novel has a strong romantic plot about an estranged husband and wife falling in love with each other that teens will love. And it also has great themes about sacrificial love and forgiveness that parents love to see their kids reading.

 

 

 


The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria Augusta Trapp is particularly powerful because it a true story. The real Maria who inspired The Sound of Music writes with a simple, charming voice how she met her future husband and family. This is a love story about Maria and the Captain, but also an example of a loving relationship in the context of family, community, and society.

 

 


They Loved to Laugh is another love story where love is experienced on several levels. It has great themes about family, friendship, and forgiveness.

 

 

 

 


The Rose Round is by the wonderful Meriol Trevor, a fantastic Catholic author who wrote one of my favorite children’s series, The Letzenstein Chronicles. The Rose Round is intended for a teen audience and follows a brother and sister pair who both find friendship and love in unlikely places. It has a great theme about looking beyond physical appearance to determine personal worth.

 

 

 


The Light Princess by George MacDonald is a classic fairy tale about a princess who loses her gravity, physically and emotionally. Only true sacrificial love from a prince can restore her to health and balance.

 

 

 

 


The Drovers Road Collection is a favorite series of mine. It follows Gay from girlhood through falling in love and marriage. Read more about in my Review of “The Drover’s Road Collection”.

 

 

 

 


The Sherwood Ring has time travel, multiple romances, period costumes, and a mystery. What more can a teenage girl ask for?

 

 

 

 

 


The beloved Anne of Green Gables series is perfect for teenage girls, mostly. Read my Review of the “Anne of Green Gables” Series for tips on which books are appropriate for teens and which have some adult content.

 

 

 

 


This list would be incomplete without some Louisa May Alcott! Though Little Women focuses mostly on sister-relationships, other Alcott books like Rose in Bloom and An Old-fashioned Girl are about finding love, sometimes in unexpected places. Rose and Polly learn to remain true to their beliefs and wait for a man wiht a pure heart.

 

 

 


Mara, Daughter of the Nile is an exciting historical fiction novel about a fiery teenage girl who becomes deeply involved in palace intrigues, caught between two rivals for the Egyptian throne. Oh, and of course there is romance too. I love how this story shows Mara’s growth from utter selfishness to understanding the sacrificial nature of love.

 

 

 


I may be stretching a bit in including Between the Forest and the Hills on a list of romances, but it does indeed have a romance as one of the many, many strands of its plot. Read my Review of “Between the Forest and the Hills” to learn more about this book.

 

 

 

 


Manalive by G. K. Chesterton is another book that fits many genres. I call it a romance for two reasons. First, because it teaches the reader that everyday life is romantic. Second, because a third of the book is about two characters falling in love and fighting in court to be allowed to marry.

 

 

Here are some novels with romantic plots I recommend for teens over 14.


Funny and memorable, My Heart Lies South is a true story about a young American journalist who falls in love on a trip to Mexico and ends up staying. Readers will love this amusing love story that also touches on the difficulties of assimilating into a different culture and family.

 

 

 


Do not assume all of Gene Stratton-Porter is appropriate for teens, but Laddie: A True Blue Story is really a charming story told by Laddie’s Little Sister, who explores themes about family, nature, redemption, and  forgiveness. She also recounts how Laddie fell in love with and won the heart of a Princess.

 

 

 


Freckles is another great book by Gene Stratton-Porter. Similar to Laddie in many ways, a simple lad must win the heart of a high-born girl. A charming romance, and a great story of personal growth and overcoming disability.

 

 

 

 


The Robe is the story of one man’s quest for love and truth. He finds it in Christ. But he does also find love with a special young woman, which teen readers will enjoy.

 

 

 

 


The James Herriot Books are the funny and endearing stories of everyday life as a country veterinarian. James Herriot weaves his story of wooing and winning his wife into his animal anecdotes.

[Parental warning: mild language]

 

 

 


Everyone knows that teenage girls should read Pride and Prejudice, but don’t stop there. Read The Jane Austen Collection for more classic stories about finding love, with a side of social commentary and comedy. 

[Parental warning: mentions of out of wedlock relationships, illegitimate children, mistresses]

 

 


The Virginian is a classic western full of cowboys, shoot-outs, and true love. With his quiet humor and gentle nature, the reader is rooting for the Virginian to win the lady.

 

 

 

 


A Tale of Two Cities is, as I mentioned above, a stellar example of how true love is sacrificial. No-good Sydney Carton never does get the girl, but his pure love for her ends up being his redemption.

 

 

 

 


P. G. Wodehouse is best known for his Jeeves and Wooster novels, but he also wrote some hilarious romantic comedies such as the Adventures of Sally. Many of his Blandings Castle novels also include a strong romantic plot, such as in Heavy Weather and
Summer Lightning.

 

 

 


A School for Unusual Girls: A Stranje House Novel is the first in a series of historical fiction novels about the Napoleonic Wars. Each book includes a love story, which is kept carefully PG. Strong female heroines abound in these novels.
[Parental warning: one of the girls is wilder and does break some of the rules, occasionally is described as dressing in a more risque fashion, etc. There is also mention of someone keeping a mistress, which is portrayed negatively.]

 


Catholic author Regina Doman has a whole series of fairy tale retellings such as The Shadow of the Bear: A Fairy Tale Retold,
Black as Night: A Fairy Tale Retold, and
Waking Rose: A Fairy Tale Retold. All are fine for teens except her retelling of Rapunzel, which is intended for adults.

[Parental warnings: one scene of attempted date rape in the very first book]

 

 

Older teens (16+) will enjoy these more difficult novels.


A classic mystery, The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins is driven by a romantic interest. The protagonist and narrator must solve the mystery of who the woman in white is in order to gain a happily ever after with his wife.

 

 

 

 

 The Prisoner of Zenda is a classic romance and adventure novel. Read my Review of “The Prisoner of Zenda” for a discussion of this novel which has some awesome themes about love and honor.

 

 

 

 


North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell is a classic story of overcoming prejudices and differences to find love. After reading the book, teenagers can also enjoy the BBC series North and South.

 

 

 

 


Jane Eyre is such an iconic love story, and the happiest of the Bronte girl novels. Of course, Jane must still overcome huge difficulties to find her happily ever after.

[Parental warning: attempted bigamy]

Review of “The Mysterious Benedict Society”

The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart looked like a fairly simple book. I had recently finished reading Orthodoxy by G. K. Chesterton, which in typical Chestertonian fashion is absolutely amazing but also leaves you feeling like your head may explode from his awe-inspiring insights. Anyway, I wanted a simple book to review and ended up choosing The Mysterious Benedict Society at the library. I soon realized this book was a poor choice if I wanted a straightforward subject. In no time, I found myself dusting off my Theology major cap and delving into the Catechism, Aquinas, and Augustine trying to ascertain the exact position the Catholic Church holds on spying and lying while spying.

A STRAIGHTFORWARD PREMISE

The plot of The Mysterious Benedict Society is fairly simple. Four lonely but gifted children (Reynie, Sticky, Kate, and Constance) are recruited by a benevolent genius (Mr. Benedict) to assist in foiling a plot by an evil genius. The evil genius aspires to control the minds of all humankind via his hi-tech invention, “The Whisperer.” The children are chosen because they have a particularly strong love for the truth and therefore a certain immunity to The Whisperer. Reynie and his friends have to go incognito into the evil genius’ organization to uncover his plans and foil them. On the surface, it’s a classic conflict of good versus evil with the reader rooting for the good guys.

LYING AND SPYING

The potentially troublesome scenario which this book creates is placing the four children undercover, in situations where they may have to lie, cheat, and otherwise practice deception. The children are repeatedly described as special because they have a strong love for the truth. This doesn’t jibe well with portraying them as lying, cheating, and so on.

The first question I had when analyzing the morality of the children’s actions was: are all the scenarios where the children tell lies under coercion or in order to preserve their secret identities? Mostly yes. Mostly. There are one or two occasions where Sticky tells a completely unnecessary lie, such as when he lies about his parents in the beginning of the book. These occasions are quite indefensible. It is up to you as a parent to decide if your child has the maturity to recognize these lies as deplorable and know not to imitate.

The rest of the lying and cheating is in the context of the children preserving their secret identities. What does the Church have to say on the morality of deception in this context? Not much, actually. There isn’t an infallible teaching about the morality of spying. In the Summa Theologica, Aquinas’ argument would preclude lying when spying. But Aquinas isn’t always right.

In a fascinating article in First ThingsEthics professor Janet Smith provides a round-up of various Catholic positions on the lying and spying question. She notes that the lack of an official Church teaching on this subject points to it being a moral gray area, rather situation dependent. She draws an analogy to taking human life. Killing is wrong, but in order to defend oneself or another innocent, one can kill. Similarly, she says, lying is wrong, but in particular situations such as to save human life, one can lie. I recommend reading her article for a more thorough understanding of her argument.

Whatever your position on the question of lying and spying, the inclusion of such a tricky subject definitely makes this children’s book more complicated than your average adventure story. I would highly recommend discussing the morality of the children’s lying in the story. In fact, this makes for a great book report topic or family discussion!

UNLIKELY FRIENDSHIPS

To counterbalance the lying question, I found a plethora of redeeming themes in The Mysterious Benedict Society. Watching four children with diverse personalities coalesce into a team is a great lesson for the reader. Sticky is shy, Reynie is a natural leader, Kate is independent, and Constance is contrary. Their only similarity is a shared love of truth and common mission. Which is plenty to form a team and eventually friendships!

OVERCOMING FEARS

Another great theme throughout the book is overcoming fear. Sticky particularly struggles with overcoming his fears to do the right thing. The Whisperer soothes his fears and makes him feel happy: a seductive evil to resist. Reynie and Sticky both find themselves tempted to succumb to The Whisperer. Reynie thinks:

“The Whisperer’s version of happiness is an illusion – it doesn’t take away your fears, it only lies to you about them, makes you temporarily believe you don’t have them. And I know it’s a lie, but what a powerful one!”

Reynie and Sticky overcome The Whisperer’s seductive pull by relying on their friendships with each other and Kate and Constance. Reynie also turns to an adult, Mr. Benedict, for his wisdom. Through the help of other people rather than a machine’s lies, Sticky and Reynie learn to push past fear to complete their mission.

TV AND TRUTH

A third theme that will make most parents smile is the juxtaposition of TV and truth. The four children are chosen because they love the truth. What is one of the primary signs of their attachment to truth? They dislike TV and its messages. Now of course, in the story the evil villain is piggybacking poisoned messages on TV waves. We don’t have that in our world… or do we? Are the messages our children ingest from the media a positive or negative in forming their moral imaginations?

RECOMMENDATIONS

Weighing the pros and cons, I found The Mysterious Benedict Society to be an enjoyable adventure story with overall wholesome themes. After a discussion of the morality of lying and spying, this book is quite appropriate for children ten and older. Younger children could also enjoy it if they are mature enough to grasp the concepts of spying, mind control, and temptation.

Review of “The Drover’s Road Collection”


The Drovers Road Collection by Joyce West could be described as a New Zealand Little House on the Prairie. I cannot say enough good things about this trilogy, yet sadly it is little known in the United States. Tweens and Teens who love adventures, a story with a strong female protagonist, and a generous dose of humor, will enjoy Drover’s Road.

These adventures are narrated by Gay Allan, a lively and adventurous girl growing up on a New Zealand sheep station. The trilogy begins with Gay and her three cousins’ humorous escapades as they “help” their Uncle Dunsany on his ranch, deep in the Maori country. The cousins may be far from civilization, but life is never quiet at Drover’s Road with its colorful cast of characters both human and animal. In Cape Lost, Gay describes growing into a young woman, experiencing first loves and heartbreaks. But don’t worry; Gay, true to her name, is always resilient and able to see the humorous side of her adventures as she comes of age. The final book, The Golden Country, is Gay’s story of taking over a sheep station of her own as a young adult.

What makes these stories so worthwhile and memorable is Gay’s worldview, wise beyond her years yet still joyful. Growing up on a sheep station, she is used to hard work and responsibility. Yet she is also gentle-hearted and merry by nature. In each chapter, whether funny or poignant, a disaster or celebration, she provides a lesson for the reader without moralizing.

Drover’s Road is a story of a different era a century ago, when cell phones and the internet were not even imagined. Gay and her cousins fill their days taming wild horses, building a hideaway under a waterfall, hunting treasure, and playing matchmaker to their various relations. I think reading about their adventure-filled, joyful lives is a great inspiration to today’s teens and tweens to turn away from their screens and consider what real adventure might look like.

Despite being an old story when it comes to technology, Gay’s atypical family situation may strike a chord in today’s kids. Gay and her three cousins are all being raised by their young uncle and a distant cousin, “Aunt” Belle. Their parents all either died or abandoned them. Though they have an idyllic life on the cattle station, the cousins still experience a sense of missing and emptiness over their lost parents. Later in the books, Gay delves into her difficult relationship with her father, whom she struggles to forgive.

The romance is light and clean, and there is no language or violence. This wonderful book is perfect for twelve and older. The only sad part is that it is out of print so you have to buy it used here, or you can buy it as an e-book from publisher Bethlehem Books or on Amazon.

Good Graphic Novels and Comic Books for Catholic Kids

Comic Books and Graphic Novels are the reading material of choice for many kids these days, especially boys. Fortunately for Catholic parents, there are some awesome options being published in this genre by Catholic publishers. Check out these great options which teach about Saints, the Bible, the Catechism, and apologetics! Also included are a few clean, enjoyable comic books just for fun!

I recently had the pleasure of reading and reviewing “The Saints Chronicles, Collection 1”, the first in a great new series being published by Sophia Institute Press. For more details, check out my review here.

 

 

 


The Adventures of Loupio chronicle the escapades of Loupio, a young troubador whose life is forever changed when he meets Saint Francis of Assisi.

 

 

 

 


Pauline Press is coming out with its own series of graphic novels based on the lives of popular saints with books like Legend of Saint Christopher and  and Saint Clare of Assisi.

 

 

 


The Action Bible is one of the most professional looking graphic novels on this list. Little surprise since its illustrator works for Marvels Comics! This Bible isn’t specifically Catholic, but it sticks fairly close to the Bible stories and is a great way to get kids interested in reading God’s word.

 

 

 

The Picture Bible, which inspired The Action Bible, is also a great resource for bringing to the Bible to life for kids! It points out themes and has some discussion questions for the major stories.

 

 

 

 


The Illustrated Parables of Jesus is published by Ignatius Press, which also publishes an entire New Testament by the same illustrator and author. We love these versions of the Bible with their gentle pictures which even toddlers enjoy pouring over.

 

 

 


I’ve included the Catechism of the Seven Sacraments on other book lists already because I can’t say enough good things about this brilliant idea for a Catechism. The information is simply presented, yet somehow touches on information many adult Catholics don’t know. For example, my six year old understands the Four Cups and how they relate to the Mass after reading this book. He had to explain it to me because I barely knew what he was talking about!

 

 


I was extremely impressed by the caliber of apologetics presented in The Truth Is Out There: Brendan & Erc in Exile, Volume 1. This book, and its sequel, The Big Picture: Brendan and Erc in Exile, Volume 2, present arguments for Christian and Catholic doctrines in a format that will be accessible and memorable for tweens and teens. Volume 1 deals with big picture questions about God’s existence, heaven, and happiness. The presupposition is that you are talking to someone who is an atheist or agnostic, which will resonate with teenagers as they begin to interact more with secularists. In Volume 2, The Big Picture, Brendan and Eric begin to learn about God’s plan. Again, there is an outspoken agnostic character who challenges the RCIA teacher about everything from Galileo to the Trinity. All this hard core apologetics is set against an appealing Sci Fi backdrop complete with junky space ships and villains.


The Zita the Spacegirl Trilogy  is an award winining series from Catholic graphic novelist Ben Hatke. His books are clean, age-appropriate, fun, and definitely worth buying!

 

 

 

 


Mighty Jack is the first in another great series by Hatke. With nods to Jack and the Beanstalk, Hatke creates an exciting world inhabited by dragons and biting pumpkins. I love that one of the characters is a (mostly) mute autistic girl. I found the themes about having a sibling with a disability timely in our current day with autism rates skyrocketing.

 

 

 


The Adventures of Tintin by Herge. What can I say? TinTin is a classic boy-sleuth series that every boy (and lots of girls) inhale. These books are clean, fun, and funny. Lots of adventure and quirky characters. Note that there is some drug and alcohol use, not portrayed favorably. Also some rather humorous swearing along the lines of “Billions of Blue Blistering Barnacles in a Thundering Typhoon.”

Good Catholic Books for Catholic Teens

My post Good Catholic Books for Catholic Preschoolers and Kindergarteners  is one of the most searched and read on this site, so today I was inspired to write a similar post aimed at Catholic teens. If you are looking for confirmation gift ideas or just good books about the Catholic faith, inspiring saints, and captivating conversions to add to your library, here is the list for you.


Ablaze: Stories of Daring Teen Saints is a collection of short stories about young saints which will inspire teens to seek holiness with passion and purpose.

 

 

 

 


Notoriously mercurial teenagers will definitely benefit from The Emotions God Gave You: A Guide for Catholics to Healthy and Holy Living by Art Bennet, author of The Temperament God Gave You. This book will lead your teenager to begin to understand and control their emotions.

 

 

 

Boys will particularly enjoy A Soldier Surrenders: The Conversion of Saint Camillus de Lellis . Saint Camillus struggled greatly against a tendency towards the vices of gambling, drinking, and brawling. His conversion is an inspiring testimony to the power of God’s grace.

 

 

 


For older teens, Louis de Wohl’s biographies of saints are great inspirational reading. He does a fine job of portraying the saints as fallible human persons who achieved sainthood by responding to God’s call in their lives. A note of warning: Louis de Wohl’s books do contain occasional mild sexual content, so I recommend them for older teens only at parental discretion.

 

 

 


George Weigel’s Letters to a Young Catholic is a fascinating tour of important historical Catholic sites, combining architecture, history, and faith into a seamless, captivating series of letters.

 

 

 

 


Jason and Crystalina Evert’s books Pure Manhood and Pure Womanhood are fantastic, short and sweet answers to questions teenagers have about dating and sex.

 

 

 

 


All Things Girl: Truth for Teens is a spectacular gift for a Catholic teenage girl! This book offers chapters on everything from modesty and fashion to social media and peer pressure. An awesome resource for Catholic moms as a discussion starter also.

 

 

 


Youcat by Cardinal Schonborn was designed with the input of high schoolers on the design team to create a visually appealing version of the Catechism to appeal to a teenage audience. If your teenager wants color images and is turned off by the weight of the full Catechism of the Catholic Church: Second Edition, then this would make a great Confirmation gift.

 

 

I AM_ by Chris Stefanick is an awesome book to give a teenager or young adult. Stefanick leads the reader to recognize that they are beautiful, courageous, strong, fearless, precious, and lovable. This is a message teenagers desperately need to hear. Each word has a short anecdote and meditation or prayer. Chris Stefanick writes in a very simple, conversational tone that will easily appeal to teenagers, even those with a short attention span!

 

 


Resisting Happiness by Matthew Kelly explains how to break past our own procrastination and laziness and choose the happiness we all desire deep in our hearts.

 

 

 

 


For the more thoughtful teen looking to deepen their spirituality, 33 Days to Morning Glory: A Do-It-Yourself Retreat In Preparation for Marian Consecration by Fr. Gaitley is a perfect at-home retreat.

 

 

Looking for a visually arresting book for a teenager who is resistant to reading a typical lives of the saints? Check out my review of Review of “The Saints Chronicles, Collection 1”.

 

 

 

 

For even more ideas of good books for Catholic teenagers, check out the section of Catholic literature on my list Good Books for Catholic High Schoolers.

Good Books for Catholic 12 to 13 Year Olds 

Tween to teen is a tricky age to pick books for, since they are looking for something challenging, but are not ready for mature content yet. I strongly believe in not overwhelming children in this age range by exposing them too early to classic literature that was intended for adults, so you will not find Charles Dickens or Jane Austen on this list. But you will find books by many other fun, age appropriate authors such as Meriol Trevor, L. M. Montgomery, and Father Francis Finn. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!

L. M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables books are beautifully written, inspiring books for girls and young women, featuring the struggles, triumphs, growing pains, and dreams of Anne. These books are often introduced to children too early; I highly recommend waiting until at least age 12 for the first book. Cheerful, dreamy Anne grows up throughout the series, so do not make the mistake of handing your daughter the whole series at once! The first three books are appropriate for middle schoolers; save the rest for high school.
Discussion: What virtues come easily to Anne? What are her flaws? How does she strive to improve herself? Does God have an important part in Anne’s life? What is most important to Anne: God, friends, home, beauty?

J. R R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, the prequel to The Lord of the Rings, is a famous fantasy adventure both girls and boys enjoy. It may even inspire a reluctant reader to continue following the story of the ring in The Fellowship of the Ring: Being the First Part of The Lord of the Rings.
Discussion: Tolkien’s books are rife with Christian symbolism and allegory. If your child becomes a real Tolkien devotee, offer The Philosophy of Tolkien: The Worldview Behind the Lord of the Rings by Peter Kreeft as an in depth look at Tolkien’s Christian perspective.

Catholic author Meriol Trevor wrote a captivating adventure series for Catholic middle schoolers which begins with The Crystal Snowstorm. Set in the tiny, fictional, European Catholic country of Letzenstein, these books chronicle the involvement of Catherine, Paul, and other English children in the politics and future of the throne of Letzenstein. The maturity, responsibility, and courage these children show are a breath of fresh air, as is Trevor’s unabashed use of a Catholic culture, faith, and values. Good and bad characters are clearly defined, all people are valued, a cripple is a hero, family trumps politics; I love Meriol Trevor. There are three sequels: Following the Phoenix , Angel and Dragon , and The Rose and Crown.

A stand alone book by Meriol Trevor, The Rose Round is on the surface a simple story of unlikely friendship between a poor cook and her brother with the rich son and granddaughter of their employer. But in typical Trevor fashion, there are many themes under the surface: being handicapped, what is truly ugly versus truly beautiful, whether love is a gift or something earned, emotional abusive people, how hurt people hurt others.

The Light Princess is a fairy tale by master storyteller George MacDonald. Subtle humor, a lesson about selfishness, and a redemption theme elevate this simple story about a princess who lost her gravity (both types) to classic literature level.

Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women is, of course, an American classic. The famous story of the struggles and joys of four sisters raised by their widowed mother has delighted girls for generations. If your daughter loves this book, by all means offer the sequels Little Men and Jo’s Boys .

A more sober but still enjoyable duo of books by Alcott, Eight Cousins
and Rose in Bloom take a thoughtful look at the virtues and flaws in eight cousins first as children then as young adults. As is typical in Alcott books, recklessness and laziness results in misfortune, while hard work, perseverance, and faithfulness are rewarded.
Discussion: Which cousins does Rose admire and why? Does Charlie bring on his own misfortune? In our current age and country marrying a cousin is atypical, but in Rose’s time it was normal.

Jack and Jill is a lesser known novel by Alcott, but at least as wonderful as her more famous works. This is another thoughtful look at the long term consequences, good and bad, recklessness can have on the doer, the injured, their families, and a whole community. And also a simply fabulous story.
Discussion: How does Jill suffer for her recklessnes? How does the free forgiveness offered her change her? How does God bring good out of her carelessness?

An Old-Fashioned Girl, a stand alone novel by Alcott, has a timely message about peer pressure and staying true to one’s values even when others see them as outdated. The heroine discovers compromising her values in order to fit in doesn’t gain her real happiness.

Have a tween who doesn’t want to read saint books? Check out my review of Catholic comic book The Saints Chronicles.

Fr. Francis Finn understood boys, and his books reflect his belief that though your average school boy is not a saint, he should strive to be one. His books are school stories about boys and for boys, complete with humor, adventure, fights, friendship, and forgiveness, and are overall imbued with a deeply Catholic worldview. His most well known trilogy begins with Tom Playfair: Or Making a Start, which is a story of a mischievous boy whose energy, when properly channeled, becomes fervor for Christ. The series continues with Percy Wynn or Making a Boy of Him, in which Tom helps teach a boy raised by his sisters about manly virtues, and Harry Dee: Or Working it Out.

Outlaws of Ravenhurst is a captivating adventure about a Scottish Catholic clan’s struggle for freedom to worship during a Catholic persecution. This inspiring story makes real the challenges and amazing faith and courage displayed by Catholics facing martyrdom.
Note: These books will particularly resonate with boys, but girls love them too!

The Great and Terrible Quest was one of the most loved books in the large family I grew up in by both boys and girls. Young Trad, an orphan, risks his life to save and care for a wounded knight. The orphan and knight set out on a quest for something which the knight cannot remember. Bravery, sacrifice, love, redemption, and some fine storytelling make this story memorable.

The Good Bad Boy, by Fr. Brennan, is written as a diary detailing the everyday challenges and thoughts of a thirteen year old Catholic boy growing up in the mid twentieth century.

The Drovers Road Collection: Three New Zealand Adventures is an absolutely charming collection of anecdotes about a young girl growing up on a sheep farm in New Zealand. Often funny, sometimes touching, with nuggets of true wisdom, these stories told by the poignant voice of young Gabrielle carry the message that life may look different on the other side of the world, but people love and learn just the same.

The Sherwood Ring is a unique combination of modern day mystery and historical fiction, with a touch of romance for good measure. This is just a well written, well researched, fun read.

Fabiola is an inspiring story about the early church during the Roman persecutions. Fabiola is a convert to Christianity whose faith is tested by fire. Cameos by popular early saints such as Sebastian add a true story feel to this Christian historical fiction.

The Small War of Sergeant Donkey is World War II historical fiction focused in a unique location: the Alpine region of Italy held by American forces. Twelve year old Chico knows the Americans are supposed to be his enemies, but ends up befriending a soldier, whose life he later saves with some help from a heroic little donkey and a creative Catholic monk.

Cleared for Action!: Four Tales of the Sea is a collection of four books by Stephen Meader, a fine author of historical fiction. These tales of courage and fortitude span fifty years of American history, including the Civil War, and are particularly interesting for boys.

Midshipman Quinn: Collection is a collection of four humorous, adventurous stories about nerdy Septimus Quinn who joins the British Royal Navy at age 15 in 1803. These historical fiction tales are made memorable by Quinn’s quirky, resourceful, ever-loyal personality.

Little Britches: Father and I Were Ranchers is the first book in Ralph Moody’s masterful retelling of growing up in the western United States at the turn of the twentieth century. This series is in many ways a twentieth century equivalent of the Little House series. Moody has a captivating storytelling style which combines details about everyday life with an engaging overall plot. Our favorite books include The Home Ranch , in which Ralph spends a summer working as a hired hand on a ranch, and Shaking the Nickel Bush, in which a broke Ralph road trips through the west making money by sculpting bankers.

A majority of Catholic historical fiction focuses on male protagonists, so I am happy to add Madeleine Takes Command to this list. Teenage Madeleine shows true heroism as she takes command of the family stockade in New France and defends her people against the Iroquois.

The Red Keep is swashbuckling historical fiction set in twelfth century France. Young Conan is determined to save the Red Keep for its rightful owner, Lady Anne. Allen French writes enjoyable, engaging historical fiction. He also wrote The Story of Rolf and the Viking Bow, which is a wonderful Viking-era story with a moral about sacrifice and redemption.

G. A. Henty is, in my humble opinion, the gold standard when it comes to historical fiction. This prolific English author wrote dozens of novels intended to educate his teenage audience on wars, countries, cultures, history. My favorites include: Beric the Briton, A Story of the Roman Invasion, With Lee in Virginia, True to the Old Flag, <In the Heart of the Rockies: An Adventure on the Colorado River, and Cat of Bubastes.
Discussion: Henty is not afraid to take a controversial perspective and tell the other side of a story. For example, in True to the Old Flag, he offers the British perspective on the American Revolution. The theme to discuss would be that in a war, there are human beings on both sides who end up suffering.

For your Egyptian historical fiction, I recommend Shadow Hawk and Mara, Daughter of the Nile . Court secrets, espionage, danger, a touch of romance: these books will hold a reader’s attention and stick in their memory.

Across Five Aprils is civil-war era historical fiction about young Jethro, who comes of age amidst the conflict of the War Between the States.

The Trumpeter of Krakow is an absorbing novel set in 1490s Poland. This story offersman interesting combination of legend with the real fact that to this day the trumpet is played on the hour in Krakow.

In World War II historical fiction, Escape from Warsaw will please boys and girls with its brother-sister protagonists. Set in the chaos accompanying the end of the war, three children must use courage and cooperation to escape Warsaw and travel across Europe to rejoin their parents.

Rosemary Sutcliff’s historical fiction about Roman Briton are some of my favorite books to recommend. Sutcliff is both an enchanting storyteller and an excellent writer. You will leave with the feeling you have visited Briton and made a new cast of friends after reading The Eagle of the Ninth , The Silver Branch, and The Lantern Bearers .

Taken by the Enemy is first in a fascinating series in that Oliver Optic wrote it soon after the Civil War, thus offering a unique historical perspective. This story of a teenage boy attempting to recover his sister from the south on the eve of the war is a tale of courage and family loyalty.

Fingal’s Quest by Madeleine Polland is a great coming of age story set against the backdrop of Irish monastic life in the sixth century. There are great thought provoking themes about what doing God’s will really means.

The Red Badge of Courage is a very well known Civil War historical fiction novel about a young man’s experience fighting in the Union Army. Memorable for its depiction of the horror of war, it is also offers a good storyline of character development through the young man’s personal battle againt cowardice.

In the realm of animal fiction, The Yearling is a famous book with its timeless themes of growing up and sacrifices. A bit sad, but a classic every young person should read.

One of my absolute favorite authors in animal fiction, Albert Payson Terhune writes with such evident affection for his beloved collie chums the reader inevitably falls in love too. His most famous book is Lad: A Dog, but he wrote equally wonderful stories about his other collie friends such as Bruce, Treve, and Gray Dawn.

How’s Inky? is the first of naturalist Sam Campbell’s books about his animal friends of the forest. Campbell combines funny anecdotes with a down to earth philosophy of life in these very enjoyable books.

Old Yeller is an American classic, comparable to The Yearling with its themes of growing up and responsibility. This is a poignant, tear-jerking story of love, loyalty, and making tough, right decisions.

The Incredible Journey is another animal story, this time about three determined pets whose loyalty and perseverance are tested on a trans-Canadian journey to find their owner. This is the book that inspired Homeward Bound.

Another classic boy-dog growing up story, Where the Red Fern Grows is the famous story of Billy and his two hounds growing up together in the Ozarks. By turns tragic and hopeful, this book is certainly worth reading for its themes of hard work, courage, perseverance, and faith.

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell is the touching life story of a horse, as told by Black Beauty himself. This story is sure to delight any young horse lover.

Loved by generations, Lassie Come-Home tells a story of loyalty and perseverance as Lassie crosses Scotland to find her master.

Pollyanna should be read for culturL literacy, but sometimes is read too young. The drama of Pollyanna not being wanted is rather heavy content for a young child, so I prefer waiting until this age when the reader can better understand that Pollyanna’s hardships are used as a foil to highlight her cheerfulness in adversity.

Henry Reed, Inc. is a simply hilarious book by Robert McCloskey about quirky Henry and sensible Midge, two all-American kids with big schemes enjoying summer in small town USA. The best part of this book is the creativity and resourcefulness these kids show. No wasting time in front of the TV here!

The Weka-Feather Cloak: A New Zealand Fantasy is an exciting, colorful adventure story with a Catholic twist. Nuns, art, legend, demons, saints, a disabled girl, thieves, and angels all play a part in this creative story by Leo Madigan. Read more about this book in my Review of “The Weka-Feather Cloak”.

On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness is the first book in The Wingfeather Saga, a great option for fantasy-loving tweens and teens. Read my in-depth review here: .

Banner in the Sky is the story of Rudi, who wants to fulfill his dead father’s dream of climbing the treacherous mountain known as The Citadel. This story highlights perseverance and courage.

Also check out my lists Good Graphic Novels and Comic Books for Catholic KidsGood Books for Catholic Kids that are also Good Movies, and Good Catholic Books for Catholic Teens.